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Restorative Elements at the Computer Workstation: A Comparison of Live Plants and Inanimate Objects With and Without Window View

Evensen, Katinka; Raanaas, Ruth K.; Hägerhäll, Caroline; Johansson, Maria LU and Patil, Grete G (2015) In Environment and Behavior 47(3). p.288-303
Abstract
The objective of the study was to test whether live plants on computer workstations with and without window view had restorative effects. Guided by Stress Recovery Theory and Attention Restoration Theory a mixed randomized experiment was conducted exploring restorative effects of plants, including mediating effects of perceived fascination. Eighty-five participants carried out a 1-hr work session with repeated tasks demanding directed attention in an office with one of three interior conditions: live plants, inanimate objects and control, all with and without a window view. Plant presence led to greater perceived fascination, but perceived fascination was not related to either self-reported restoration or directed attention capacity. The... (More)
The objective of the study was to test whether live plants on computer workstations with and without window view had restorative effects. Guided by Stress Recovery Theory and Attention Restoration Theory a mixed randomized experiment was conducted exploring restorative effects of plants, including mediating effects of perceived fascination. Eighty-five participants carried out a 1-hr work session with repeated tasks demanding directed attention in an office with one of three interior conditions: live plants, inanimate objects and control, all with and without a window view. Plant presence led to greater perceived fascination, but perceived fascination was not related to either self-reported restoration or directed attention capacity. The presence of plants during work did not have superior restorative effects compared with inanimate objects, neither with nor without access to a window view. However, environmental enrichment with either plants or inanimate objects at the computer workstation seemed to provide a restorative potential, which should be investigated further. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
indoor plants, mental fatigue, office design, natural elements, people−plant interactions
in
Environment and Behavior
volume
47
issue
3
pages
288 - 303
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000350557900003
  • scopus:84924910273
ISSN
1552-390X
DOI
10.1177/0013916513499584
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
29d1ad72-0729-4eda-8a57-e702d4aaf7fe (old id 4856607)
date added to LUP
2014-12-03 16:49:47
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:02:59
@article{29d1ad72-0729-4eda-8a57-e702d4aaf7fe,
  abstract     = {The objective of the study was to test whether live plants on computer workstations with and without window view had restorative effects. Guided by Stress Recovery Theory and Attention Restoration Theory a mixed randomized experiment was conducted exploring restorative effects of plants, including mediating effects of perceived fascination. Eighty-five participants carried out a 1-hr work session with repeated tasks demanding directed attention in an office with one of three interior conditions: live plants, inanimate objects and control, all with and without a window view. Plant presence led to greater perceived fascination, but perceived fascination was not related to either self-reported restoration or directed attention capacity. The presence of plants during work did not have superior restorative effects compared with inanimate objects, neither with nor without access to a window view. However, environmental enrichment with either plants or inanimate objects at the computer workstation seemed to provide a restorative potential, which should be investigated further.},
  author       = {Evensen, Katinka and Raanaas, Ruth K. and Hägerhäll, Caroline and Johansson, Maria and Patil, Grete G},
  issn         = {1552-390X},
  keyword      = {indoor plants,mental fatigue,office design,natural elements,people−plant interactions},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {288--303},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Environment and Behavior},
  title        = {Restorative Elements at the Computer Workstation: A Comparison of Live Plants and Inanimate Objects With and Without Window View},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0013916513499584},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2015},
}