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Size-dependent long-term tissue response to biostable nanowires in the brain.

Gällentoft, Lina LU ; Pettersson, Lina LU ; Danielsen, Nils LU ; Schouenborg, Jens LU ; Prinz, Christelle LU and Eriksson Linsmeier, Cecilia LU (2015) In Biomaterials 42. p.172-183
Abstract
Nanostructured neural interfaces, comprising nanotubes or nanowires, have the potential to overcome the present hurdles of achieving stable communication with neuronal networks for long periods of time. This would have a strong impact on brain research. However, little information is available on the brain response to implanted high-aspect-ratio nanoparticles, which share morphological similarities with asbestos fibres. Here, we investigated the glial response and neuronal loss in the rat brain after implantation of biostable and structurally controlled nanowires of different lengths for a period up to one year post-surgery. Our results show that, as for lung and abdominal tissue, the brain is subject to a sustained, local inflammation... (More)
Nanostructured neural interfaces, comprising nanotubes or nanowires, have the potential to overcome the present hurdles of achieving stable communication with neuronal networks for long periods of time. This would have a strong impact on brain research. However, little information is available on the brain response to implanted high-aspect-ratio nanoparticles, which share morphological similarities with asbestos fibres. Here, we investigated the glial response and neuronal loss in the rat brain after implantation of biostable and structurally controlled nanowires of different lengths for a period up to one year post-surgery. Our results show that, as for lung and abdominal tissue, the brain is subject to a sustained, local inflammation when biostable and high-aspect-ratio nanoparticles of 5 μm or longer are present in the brain tissue. In addition, a significant loss of neurons was observed adjacent to the 10 μm nanowires after one year. Notably, the inflammatory response was restricted to a narrow zone around the nanowires and did not escalate between 12 weeks and one year. Furthermore, 2 μm nanowires did not cause significant inflammatory response nor significant loss of neurons nearby. The present results provide key information for the design of future neural implants based on nanomaterials. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biomaterials
volume
42
pages
172 - 183
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:25542805
  • wos:000348883700018
  • scopus:84919654275
ISSN
1878-5905
DOI
10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.11.051
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ad4f12be-ffa6-4b8d-9cb7-85a7753c8dc0 (old id 4905601)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542805?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-01-06 11:55:36
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:17:06
@article{ad4f12be-ffa6-4b8d-9cb7-85a7753c8dc0,
  abstract     = {Nanostructured neural interfaces, comprising nanotubes or nanowires, have the potential to overcome the present hurdles of achieving stable communication with neuronal networks for long periods of time. This would have a strong impact on brain research. However, little information is available on the brain response to implanted high-aspect-ratio nanoparticles, which share morphological similarities with asbestos fibres. Here, we investigated the glial response and neuronal loss in the rat brain after implantation of biostable and structurally controlled nanowires of different lengths for a period up to one year post-surgery. Our results show that, as for lung and abdominal tissue, the brain is subject to a sustained, local inflammation when biostable and high-aspect-ratio nanoparticles of 5 μm or longer are present in the brain tissue. In addition, a significant loss of neurons was observed adjacent to the 10 μm nanowires after one year. Notably, the inflammatory response was restricted to a narrow zone around the nanowires and did not escalate between 12 weeks and one year. Furthermore, 2 μm nanowires did not cause significant inflammatory response nor significant loss of neurons nearby. The present results provide key information for the design of future neural implants based on nanomaterials.},
  author       = {Gällentoft, Lina and Pettersson, Lina and Danielsen, Nils and Schouenborg, Jens and Prinz, Christelle and Eriksson Linsmeier, Cecilia},
  issn         = {1878-5905},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {172--183},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biomaterials},
  title        = {Size-dependent long-term tissue response to biostable nanowires in the brain.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.11.051},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2015},
}