Advanced

Living with companion animals after stroke: experiences of older people in community and primary care nursing.

Johansson, Maria LU ; Ahlström, Gerd LU and Jönsson, Ann-Cathrin LU (2014) In British Journal of Community Nursing 19(12). p.578-584
Abstract
Older people often have companion animals, and the significance of animals in human lives should be considered by nurses-particularly in relation to older people's health, which can be affected by diseases. The incidence of stroke increases with age and disabilities as a result of stroke are common. This study aimed to explore older people's experiences of living with companion animals after stroke, and their life situation with the animals in relation to the physical, psychological and social aspects of recovery after stroke. The study was performed using individual interviews approximately 2 years after stroke with 17 participants (10 women and 7 men) aged 62-88 years. An overarching theme arising from the content analysis was... (More)
Older people often have companion animals, and the significance of animals in human lives should be considered by nurses-particularly in relation to older people's health, which can be affected by diseases. The incidence of stroke increases with age and disabilities as a result of stroke are common. This study aimed to explore older people's experiences of living with companion animals after stroke, and their life situation with the animals in relation to the physical, psychological and social aspects of recovery after stroke. The study was performed using individual interviews approximately 2 years after stroke with 17 participants (10 women and 7 men) aged 62-88 years. An overarching theme arising from the content analysis was contribution to a meaningful life. This theme was generated from four categories: motivation for physical and psychosocial recovery after stroke; someone to care for who cares for you; animals as family members; and providers of safety and protection. The main conclusion was that companion animals are experienced as physical and psychosocial contributors to recovery and a meaningful life after stroke. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Community Nursing
volume
19
issue
12
pages
578 - 584
publisher
MA Healthcare Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:25475671
  • scopus:84916596271
ISSN
1462-4753
DOI
10.12968/bjcn.2014.19.12.578
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4c83254-d993-48b9-9a5b-5cf855e617df (old id 4912700)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25475671?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-01-10 11:51:55
date last changed
2017-06-11 04:20:56
@article{e4c83254-d993-48b9-9a5b-5cf855e617df,
  abstract     = {Older people often have companion animals, and the significance of animals in human lives should be considered by nurses-particularly in relation to older people's health, which can be affected by diseases. The incidence of stroke increases with age and disabilities as a result of stroke are common. This study aimed to explore older people's experiences of living with companion animals after stroke, and their life situation with the animals in relation to the physical, psychological and social aspects of recovery after stroke. The study was performed using individual interviews approximately 2 years after stroke with 17 participants (10 women and 7 men) aged 62-88 years. An overarching theme arising from the content analysis was contribution to a meaningful life. This theme was generated from four categories: motivation for physical and psychosocial recovery after stroke; someone to care for who cares for you; animals as family members; and providers of safety and protection. The main conclusion was that companion animals are experienced as physical and psychosocial contributors to recovery and a meaningful life after stroke.},
  author       = {Johansson, Maria and Ahlström, Gerd and Jönsson, Ann-Cathrin},
  issn         = {1462-4753},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {578--584},
  publisher    = {MA Healthcare Ltd},
  series       = {British Journal of Community Nursing},
  title        = {Living with companion animals after stroke: experiences of older people in community and primary care nursing.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2014.19.12.578},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2014},
}