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Adherence to oral glucose tolerance testing in children in stage 1 of type 1 diabetes : The TEDDY study

Driscoll, Kimberly A. ; Tamura, Roy ; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett LU ; Gesualdo, Patricia ; Clasen, Joanna ; Smith, Laura ; Jacobsen, Laura ; Elding Larsson, Helena LU and Haller, Michael J. (2021) In Pediatric Diabetes 22(2). p.360-368
Abstract

Objective: To examine adherence to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in multiple islet autoantibody children in stage 1 of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods: Children are followed from birth in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Completion of an OGTT is recommended every 6 months in children ≥3 years of age who are multiple islet autoantibody positive. Factors associated with adherence to the OGTT protocol were examined. Results: The average subject level adherence with the OGTT protocol was 62% although there were large differences across countries; Finnish participants and older children from Sweden were more adherent than participants from the United States and Germany. Factors... (More)

Objective: To examine adherence to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in multiple islet autoantibody children in stage 1 of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods: Children are followed from birth in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Completion of an OGTT is recommended every 6 months in children ≥3 years of age who are multiple islet autoantibody positive. Factors associated with adherence to the OGTT protocol were examined. Results: The average subject level adherence with the OGTT protocol was 62% although there were large differences across countries; Finnish participants and older children from Sweden were more adherent than participants from the United States and Germany. Factors associated with nonadherence included having a first-degree relative with T1D, using a local laboratory rather than a TEDDY center for the OGTT, and maternal underestimation of the child's risk for T1D. Children were more adherent to the OGTT if their mothers: were more satisfied with TEDDY participation, reported monitoring the child for T1D by checking blood glucose levels at home, and viewed participating in TEDDY as the primary way they were monitoring the child for T1D. Conclusions: In a study of children in stage 1 of T1D, adherence to an OGTT protocol was suboptimal despite extensive efforts to communicate the child's high risk to parents. These findings provide important guidance for development of strategies to improve methods for detecting progression or the development of T1D in high-risk pediatric populations.

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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
author collaboration
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
genetic risk, genetic studies, stage 1 type 1 diabetes
in
Pediatric Diabetes
volume
22
issue
2
pages
360 - 368
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85099053643
  • pmid:33179853
ISSN
1399-543X
DOI
10.1111/pedi.13149
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
494a26e0-c122-4cbb-afb8-b55f166228e5
date added to LUP
2021-01-21 14:45:30
date last changed
2022-09-24 19:51:39
@article{494a26e0-c122-4cbb-afb8-b55f166228e5,
  abstract     = {{<p>Objective: To examine adherence to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in multiple islet autoantibody children in stage 1 of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods: Children are followed from birth in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Completion of an OGTT is recommended every 6 months in children ≥3 years of age who are multiple islet autoantibody positive. Factors associated with adherence to the OGTT protocol were examined. Results: The average subject level adherence with the OGTT protocol was 62% although there were large differences across countries; Finnish participants and older children from Sweden were more adherent than participants from the United States and Germany. Factors associated with nonadherence included having a first-degree relative with T1D, using a local laboratory rather than a TEDDY center for the OGTT, and maternal underestimation of the child's risk for T1D. Children were more adherent to the OGTT if their mothers: were more satisfied with TEDDY participation, reported monitoring the child for T1D by checking blood glucose levels at home, and viewed participating in TEDDY as the primary way they were monitoring the child for T1D. Conclusions: In a study of children in stage 1 of T1D, adherence to an OGTT protocol was suboptimal despite extensive efforts to communicate the child's high risk to parents. These findings provide important guidance for development of strategies to improve methods for detecting progression or the development of T1D in high-risk pediatric populations.</p>}},
  author       = {{Driscoll, Kimberly A. and Tamura, Roy and Johnson, Suzanne Bennett and Gesualdo, Patricia and Clasen, Joanna and Smith, Laura and Jacobsen, Laura and Elding Larsson, Helena and Haller, Michael J.}},
  issn         = {{1399-543X}},
  keywords     = {{genetic risk; genetic studies; stage 1 type 1 diabetes}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{360--368}},
  publisher    = {{Wiley-Blackwell}},
  series       = {{Pediatric Diabetes}},
  title        = {{Adherence to oral glucose tolerance testing in children in stage 1 of type 1 diabetes : The TEDDY study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pedi.13149}},
  doi          = {{10.1111/pedi.13149}},
  volume       = {{22}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}