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The secondary bile acid isoursodeoxycholate correlates with post-prandial lipemia, inflammation, and appetite and changes post-bariatric surgery

Louca, Panayiotis ; Meijnikman, Abraham S. ; Nogal, Ana ; Asnicar, Francesco ; Attaye, Ilias ; Vijay, Amrita ; Kouraki, Afroditi ; Visconti, Alessia ; Wong, Kari and Berry, Sarah E. , et al. (2023) In Cell Reports Medicine 4(4).
Abstract

Primary and secondary bile acids (BAs) influence metabolism and inflammation, and the gut microbiome modulates levels of BAs. We systematically explore the host genetic, gut microbial, and habitual dietary contribution to a panel of 19 serum and 15 stool BAs in two population-based cohorts (TwinsUK, n = 2,382; ZOE PREDICT-1, n = 327) and assess changes post-bariatric surgery and after nutritional interventions. We report that BAs have a moderately heritable genetic component, and the gut microbiome accurately predicts their levels in serum and stool. The secondary BA isoursodeoxycholate (isoUDCA) can be explained mostly by gut microbes (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = ∼80%) and associates with... (More)

Primary and secondary bile acids (BAs) influence metabolism and inflammation, and the gut microbiome modulates levels of BAs. We systematically explore the host genetic, gut microbial, and habitual dietary contribution to a panel of 19 serum and 15 stool BAs in two population-based cohorts (TwinsUK, n = 2,382; ZOE PREDICT-1, n = 327) and assess changes post-bariatric surgery and after nutritional interventions. We report that BAs have a moderately heritable genetic component, and the gut microbiome accurately predicts their levels in serum and stool. The secondary BA isoursodeoxycholate (isoUDCA) can be explained mostly by gut microbes (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = ∼80%) and associates with post-prandial lipemia and inflammation (GlycA). Furthermore, circulating isoUDCA decreases significantly 1 year after bariatric surgery (β = −0.72, p = 1 × 10−5) and in response to fiber supplementation (β = −0.37, p < 0.03) but not omega-3 supplementation. In healthy individuals, isoUDCA fasting levels correlate with pre-meal appetite (p < 1 × 10−4). Our findings indicate an important role for isoUDCA in lipid metabolism, appetite, and, potentially, cardiometabolic risk.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bariatric surgery, bile acids, liver function, post-prandial, triglycerides
in
Cell Reports Medicine
volume
4
issue
4
article number
100993
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85152733309
  • pmid:37023745
ISSN
2666-3791
DOI
10.1016/j.xcrm.2023.100993
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a2aa43c-edda-4659-b62c-9897ccb6de8f
date added to LUP
2023-10-09 16:37:58
date last changed
2024-04-04 23:54:03
@article{4a2aa43c-edda-4659-b62c-9897ccb6de8f,
  abstract     = {{<p>Primary and secondary bile acids (BAs) influence metabolism and inflammation, and the gut microbiome modulates levels of BAs. We systematically explore the host genetic, gut microbial, and habitual dietary contribution to a panel of 19 serum and 15 stool BAs in two population-based cohorts (TwinsUK, n = 2,382; ZOE PREDICT-1, n = 327) and assess changes post-bariatric surgery and after nutritional interventions. We report that BAs have a moderately heritable genetic component, and the gut microbiome accurately predicts their levels in serum and stool. The secondary BA isoursodeoxycholate (isoUDCA) can be explained mostly by gut microbes (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = ∼80%) and associates with post-prandial lipemia and inflammation (GlycA). Furthermore, circulating isoUDCA decreases significantly 1 year after bariatric surgery (β = −0.72, p = 1 × 10<sup>−5</sup>) and in response to fiber supplementation (β = −0.37, p &lt; 0.03) but not omega-3 supplementation. In healthy individuals, isoUDCA fasting levels correlate with pre-meal appetite (p &lt; 1 × 10<sup>−4</sup>). Our findings indicate an important role for isoUDCA in lipid metabolism, appetite, and, potentially, cardiometabolic risk.</p>}},
  author       = {{Louca, Panayiotis and Meijnikman, Abraham S. and Nogal, Ana and Asnicar, Francesco and Attaye, Ilias and Vijay, Amrita and Kouraki, Afroditi and Visconti, Alessia and Wong, Kari and Berry, Sarah E. and Leeming, Emily R. and Mompeo, Olatz and Tettamanzi, Francesca and Baleanu, Andrei Florin and Falchi, Mario and Hadjigeorgiou, George and Wolf, Jonathan and Acherman, Yair I.Z. and Van de Laar, Arnold W. and Gerdes, Victor E.A. and Michelotti, Gregory A. and Franks, Paul W. and Segata, Nicola and Mangino, Massimo and Spector, Tim D. and Bulsiewicz, William J. and Nieuwdorp, Max and Valdes, Ana M. and Menni, Cristina}},
  issn         = {{2666-3791}},
  keywords     = {{bariatric surgery; bile acids; liver function; post-prandial; triglycerides}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{04}},
  number       = {{4}},
  publisher    = {{Elsevier}},
  series       = {{Cell Reports Medicine}},
  title        = {{The secondary bile acid isoursodeoxycholate correlates with post-prandial lipemia, inflammation, and appetite and changes post-bariatric surgery}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xcrm.2023.100993}},
  doi          = {{10.1016/j.xcrm.2023.100993}},
  volume       = {{4}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}