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A low-carbohydrate diet may prevent end-stage renal failure in type 2 diabetes. A case report

Nielsen, Jorgen Vesti ; Westerlund, Per and Bygren, Per LU (2006) In Nutrition & Metabolism 3.
Abstract
An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function. The reversal of the renal function was likely caused by both improved glycemic control and elimination of the patient's obesity. Insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes patients usually leads to weight increase which may cause further injury to the kidney. Although other unknown metabolic mechanisms cannot be excluded, it is likely that the obesity caused by the combination of high-carbohydrate diet and insulin in this case contributed to the patient's deteriorating kidney... (More)
An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function. The reversal of the renal function was likely caused by both improved glycemic control and elimination of the patient's obesity. Insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes patients usually leads to weight increase which may cause further injury to the kidney. Although other unknown metabolic mechanisms cannot be excluded, it is likely that the obesity caused by the combination of high-carbohydrate diet and insulin in this case contributed to the patient's deteriorating kidney function. In such patients, where control of bodyweight and hyperglycemia is vital, a trial with a low-carbohydrate diet may be appropriate to avoid the risk of adding obesity-associated renal failure to already failing kidneys. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nutrition & Metabolism
volume
3
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000239460000001
  • scopus:33746532223
  • pmid:16774676
ISSN
1743-7075
DOI
10.1186/1743-7075-3-23
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4af01ed2-ec03-44d7-bc22-ae430212c82d (old id 908531)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 17:15:18
date last changed
2020-03-11 05:51:04
@article{4af01ed2-ec03-44d7-bc22-ae430212c82d,
  abstract     = {An obese patient with type 2 diabetes whose diet was changed from the recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat type to a low-carbohydrate diet showed a significant reduction in bodyweight, improved glycemic control and a reversal of a six year long decline of renal function. The reversal of the renal function was likely caused by both improved glycemic control and elimination of the patient's obesity. Insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes patients usually leads to weight increase which may cause further injury to the kidney. Although other unknown metabolic mechanisms cannot be excluded, it is likely that the obesity caused by the combination of high-carbohydrate diet and insulin in this case contributed to the patient's deteriorating kidney function. In such patients, where control of bodyweight and hyperglycemia is vital, a trial with a low-carbohydrate diet may be appropriate to avoid the risk of adding obesity-associated renal failure to already failing kidneys.},
  author       = {Nielsen, Jorgen Vesti and Westerlund, Per and Bygren, Per},
  issn         = {1743-7075},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Nutrition & Metabolism},
  title        = {A low-carbohydrate diet may prevent end-stage renal failure in type 2 diabetes. A case report},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-7075-3-23},
  doi          = {10.1186/1743-7075-3-23},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2006},
}