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Influence of early-life parental severe life events on the risk of type 1 diabetes in children : the DiPiS study

Lundgren, Markus LU ; Ellström, Katarina LU and Elding Larsson, Helena LU (2018) In Acta Diabetologica 55(8). p.797-804
Abstract

Aims: Stress and severe life events (SLEs) modify autoimmune disease susceptibility. Here, we aimed to establish if SLEs reported by parents during the first 2 years of life influence the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) using data from the prospective Diabetes Prediction in Skåne (DiPiS) study. Methods: Prospective questionnaire data recorded at 2 months (n = 23,187) and 2 years of age (n = 3784) from the DiPiS cohort of children were included in the analysis. SLEs were analyzed both by groups and as a combined variable. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for T1D diagnosis for the total cohort and for the HLA-DQ2/8 high-risk population. Affected first-degree relatives, HLA-DQ risk group,... (More)

Aims: Stress and severe life events (SLEs) modify autoimmune disease susceptibility. Here, we aimed to establish if SLEs reported by parents during the first 2 years of life influence the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) using data from the prospective Diabetes Prediction in Skåne (DiPiS) study. Methods: Prospective questionnaire data recorded at 2 months (n = 23,187) and 2 years of age (n = 3784) from the DiPiS cohort of children were included in the analysis. SLEs were analyzed both by groups and as a combined variable. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for T1D diagnosis for the total cohort and for the HLA-DQ2/8 high-risk population. Affected first-degree relatives, HLA-DQ risk group, paternal education level, and parents’ country of birth were included as covariates. Results: There was a significantly increased risk of T1D in children with SLEs occurring during the child’s first 2 years of life for both the total cohort (HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.1, 2.7; p = 0.03) and the DQ2/8 cohort (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1, 4.2; p = 0.018). Subgroup analysis of events related to unemployment, divorce, or family conflict showed a significant hazard for these events occurring both during and after pregnancy in the DQ2/8 cohort (HR 2.17; 95% CI 1.1, 4.3; p = 0.03 and HR 4.98; 95% CI 2.3, 11; p < 0.001, respectively) and after pregnancy in the total cohort (multiple regression HR 2.07; 95% CI 1.01, 4.2; p = 0.047). Conclusions: Children of parents experiencing an SLE during the child’s first 2 years of life were at increased risk of T1D. Further studies including those measuring immune and stress-related biomarkers are necessary to validate the findings.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Diabetes mellitus, Pediatrics, Prospective studies, Psychological, Stress, Type 1
in
Acta Diabetologica
volume
55
issue
8
pages
797 - 804
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85046821987
ISSN
0940-5429
DOI
10.1007/s00592-018-1150-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4afb2d1a-98b3-42a1-b2b3-d76352c61b65
date added to LUP
2018-05-23 13:57:04
date last changed
2019-01-14 17:08:59
@article{4afb2d1a-98b3-42a1-b2b3-d76352c61b65,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims: Stress and severe life events (SLEs) modify autoimmune disease susceptibility. Here, we aimed to establish if SLEs reported by parents during the first 2 years of life influence the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) using data from the prospective Diabetes Prediction in Skåne (DiPiS) study. Methods: Prospective questionnaire data recorded at 2 months (n = 23,187) and 2 years of age (n = 3784) from the DiPiS cohort of children were included in the analysis. SLEs were analyzed both by groups and as a combined variable. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for T1D diagnosis for the total cohort and for the HLA-DQ2/8 high-risk population. Affected first-degree relatives, HLA-DQ risk group, paternal education level, and parents’ country of birth were included as covariates. Results: There was a significantly increased risk of T1D in children with SLEs occurring during the child’s first 2 years of life for both the total cohort (HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.1, 2.7; p = 0.03) and the DQ2/8 cohort (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1, 4.2; p = 0.018). Subgroup analysis of events related to unemployment, divorce, or family conflict showed a significant hazard for these events occurring both during and after pregnancy in the DQ2/8 cohort (HR 2.17; 95% CI 1.1, 4.3; p = 0.03 and HR 4.98; 95% CI 2.3, 11; p &lt; 0.001, respectively) and after pregnancy in the total cohort (multiple regression HR 2.07; 95% CI 1.01, 4.2; p = 0.047). Conclusions: Children of parents experiencing an SLE during the child’s first 2 years of life were at increased risk of T1D. Further studies including those measuring immune and stress-related biomarkers are necessary to validate the findings.</p>},
  author       = {Lundgren, Markus and Ellström, Katarina and Elding Larsson, Helena},
  issn         = {0940-5429},
  keyword      = {Diabetes mellitus,Pediatrics,Prospective studies,Psychological,Stress,Type 1},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {797--804},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Acta Diabetologica},
  title        = {Influence of early-life parental severe life events on the risk of type 1 diabetes in children : the DiPiS study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00592-018-1150-y},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2018},
}