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Dust-free bleaching powder may not prevent symptoms in hairdressers with bleaching-associated rhinitis

Nielsen, Jörn LU ; Nilsson, Patrik LU ; Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Diab, Kerstin Kronholm LU ; Albin, Maria LU ; Kåredal, Monica LU ; Jönsson, Bo LU ; Wierzbicka, Aneta LU and Gudmundsson, Anders LU (2016) In Journal of Occupational Health 58(5). p.470-476
Abstract

Objective: Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hairbleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Methods: Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in... (More)

Objective: Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hairbleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Methods: Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in the morning after exposure to measure inflammatory markers. Results: Exposure to persulfate was higher when using RP compared to DFP, 22 (11-55) vs. 12 (8- 13) μg/m3; median (min-max). Exposure to ammonia did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported an increase in asthma-like symptoms and this increase was significant. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes increased after exposure in both groups; monocytes decreased the day after. In nasal lavage, IL-8 was increased the morning after for both types of powder, and the increase was significant in the total group. IL-6 increased immediately after exposure and the day after only in the group using RP. Conclusions: Although DFP powder emits lower levels of persulfate, effects are still elicited in symptomatic hairdressers.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Biomarkers, Hypersensitivity, Inflammation, Occupational exposure
in
Journal of Occupational Health
volume
58
issue
5
pages
7 pages
publisher
Japan Society for Occupational Health
external identifiers
  • scopus:85010015265
  • wos:000385911800010
ISSN
1341-9145
DOI
10.1539/joh.16-0073-OA
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4be1fda4-3082-4238-a932-832851bbea71
date added to LUP
2017-02-10 14:19:14
date last changed
2017-11-09 15:14:15
@article{4be1fda4-3082-4238-a932-832851bbea71,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hairbleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Methods: Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in the morning after exposure to measure inflammatory markers. Results: Exposure to persulfate was higher when using RP compared to DFP, 22 (11-55) vs. 12 (8- 13) μg/m3; median (min-max). Exposure to ammonia did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported an increase in asthma-like symptoms and this increase was significant. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes increased after exposure in both groups; monocytes decreased the day after. In nasal lavage, IL-8 was increased the morning after for both types of powder, and the increase was significant in the total group. IL-6 increased immediately after exposure and the day after only in the group using RP. Conclusions: Although DFP powder emits lower levels of persulfate, effects are still elicited in symptomatic hairdressers.</p>},
  author       = {Nielsen, Jörn and Nilsson, Patrik and Dahlman-Höglund, Anna and Diab, Kerstin Kronholm and Albin, Maria and Kåredal, Monica and Jönsson, Bo and Wierzbicka, Aneta and Gudmundsson, Anders},
  issn         = {1341-9145},
  keyword      = {Biomarkers,Hypersensitivity,Inflammation,Occupational exposure},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {470--476},
  publisher    = {Japan Society for Occupational Health},
  series       = {Journal of Occupational Health},
  title        = {Dust-free bleaching powder may not prevent symptoms in hairdressers with bleaching-associated rhinitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1539/joh.16-0073-OA},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2016},
}