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The surgical approach for hemiarthroplasty does not influence patient-reported outcome : a national survey of 2118 patients with one-year follow-upa

Leonardsson, O LU ; Rolfson, O and Rogmark, C LU (2016) In The Bone & Joint Journal 98-B(4). p.7-542
Abstract

AIMS: Hemiarthroplasty of the hip is usually carried out through either a direct lateral or posterior approach. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine any differences in patient-reported outcomes between the two surgical approaches.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: From the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register we identified patients of 70 years and above who were recorded as having had a hemiarthroplasty during 2009. Only patients who had been treated with modern prostheses were included. A questionnaire was posted to those who remained alive one year after surgery. A total of 2118 patients (78% of those available) with a mean age of 85 years (70 to 102) returned the questionnaire.

RESULTS: Patients who had... (More)

AIMS: Hemiarthroplasty of the hip is usually carried out through either a direct lateral or posterior approach. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine any differences in patient-reported outcomes between the two surgical approaches.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: From the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register we identified patients of 70 years and above who were recorded as having had a hemiarthroplasty during 2009. Only patients who had been treated with modern prostheses were included. A questionnaire was posted to those who remained alive one year after surgery. A total of 2118 patients (78% of those available) with a mean age of 85 years (70 to 102) returned the questionnaire.

RESULTS: Patients who had undergone surgery through a posterior approach reported a higher health-related quality of life (HRQoL, EQ-5D mean 0.52 versus 0.47, p = 0.009), less pain (visual analogue scale mean 17 versus 19, p = 0.02) and greater satisfaction with the result of surgery (visual analogue scale mean 22 versus 24, p = 0.02) than those who had a direct lateral approach. However, after adjusting for age, gender, cognitive impairment and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, no association was found between surgical approach and HRQoL, residual pain or patient satisfaction.

TAKE HOME MESSAGE: The surgical approach for hemiarthroplasty does not seem to affect the patient-perceived HRQoL, residual pain or patient satisfaction one year after surgery on elderly patients. The choice of approach should be based on other factors, such as the risk of dislocation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:542-7.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Bone & Joint Journal
volume
98-B
issue
4
pages
6 pages
publisher
British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery
external identifiers
  • scopus:84962675505
ISSN
2049-4408
DOI
10.1302/0301-620X.98B4.36626
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d342cc5-9bd5-4680-8d8a-59d496f989a8
date added to LUP
2016-04-27 12:28:19
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:30:20
@article{4d342cc5-9bd5-4680-8d8a-59d496f989a8,
  abstract     = {<p>AIMS: Hemiarthroplasty of the hip is usually carried out through either a direct lateral or posterior approach. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine any differences in patient-reported outcomes between the two surgical approaches.</p><p>PATIENTS AND METHODS: From the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register we identified patients of 70 years and above who were recorded as having had a hemiarthroplasty during 2009. Only patients who had been treated with modern prostheses were included. A questionnaire was posted to those who remained alive one year after surgery. A total of 2118 patients (78% of those available) with a mean age of 85 years (70 to 102) returned the questionnaire.</p><p>RESULTS: Patients who had undergone surgery through a posterior approach reported a higher health-related quality of life (HRQoL, EQ-5D mean 0.52 versus 0.47, p = 0.009), less pain (visual analogue scale mean 17 versus 19, p = 0.02) and greater satisfaction with the result of surgery (visual analogue scale mean 22 versus 24, p = 0.02) than those who had a direct lateral approach. However, after adjusting for age, gender, cognitive impairment and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, no association was found between surgical approach and HRQoL, residual pain or patient satisfaction.</p><p>TAKE HOME MESSAGE: The surgical approach for hemiarthroplasty does not seem to affect the patient-perceived HRQoL, residual pain or patient satisfaction one year after surgery on elderly patients. The choice of approach should be based on other factors, such as the risk of dislocation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:542-7.</p>},
  author       = {Leonardsson, O and Rolfson, O and Rogmark, C},
  issn         = {2049-4408},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {7--542},
  publisher    = {British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery},
  series       = {The Bone & Joint Journal},
  title        = {The surgical approach for hemiarthroplasty does not influence patient-reported outcome : a national survey of 2118 patients with one-year follow-upa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.98B4.36626},
  volume       = {98-B},
  year         = {2016},
}