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Variation in pain related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) : a 7-year follow-up study

Waldheim, Eva ; Ajeganova, Sofia ; Bergman, Stefan LU ; Frostegård, Johan and Welin, Elisabet (2018) In Clinical Rheumatology 37(7). p.1825-1834
Abstract

We have previously shown that most patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) reported low degree of SLE-related pain. However, 24% of the patients reported high degree of SLE-related pain, more fatigue, anxiety and depression, and worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To explore SLE-related pain, the presence of long-standing widespread pain, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after 7 years. Sixty-four out of 84 patients participated in a 7-year follow-up of the original survey and completed the same questionnaires answered at inclusion: pain (VAS 100 mm), fatigue (MAF), HRQoL (SF-36), anxiety and depression (HADS), and, if appropriate, a pain-drawing. Differences between inclusion and follow-up (change) were... (More)

We have previously shown that most patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) reported low degree of SLE-related pain. However, 24% of the patients reported high degree of SLE-related pain, more fatigue, anxiety and depression, and worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To explore SLE-related pain, the presence of long-standing widespread pain, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after 7 years. Sixty-four out of 84 patients participated in a 7-year follow-up of the original survey and completed the same questionnaires answered at inclusion: pain (VAS 100 mm), fatigue (MAF), HRQoL (SF-36), anxiety and depression (HADS), and, if appropriate, a pain-drawing. Differences between inclusion and follow-up (change) were calculated. The patients with a low degree of SLE-related pain at inclusion reported no changes at follow-up in pain and PROs except for worsening in physical function in SF-36, median change (IQR) 0 (− 10 to 5), p = 0.024. Half of the patients with high degree of pain at inclusion reported decreased pain at follow-up, median change (IQR) 45 (35 to 65), p = 0.021; fatigue, 8 (8 to 17), p = 0.018; anxiety, 4 (1 to 4), p = 0.035; and depression, 4 (2 to 5), p = 0.018 and improvements in most dimensions of SF-36. The remaining half of the patients reported no changes regarding pain and PROs except for a worsening in vitality in SF-36, 20 (15 to 35), p = 0.0018. All patients with remaining high level of pain indicated long-standing widespread pain. After 7 years, a subgroup of patients with SLE reported remaining high level of SLE-related pain and a high symptom burden, including long-standing widespread pain. Such patients require more observant attention to receive appropriate treatment.

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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue, Health-related quality of life, Pain, SLE
in
Clinical Rheumatology
volume
37
issue
7
pages
1825 - 1834
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:29654486
  • scopus:85045244134
ISSN
0770-3198
DOI
10.1007/s10067-018-4079-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4e319416-9214-4f5b-b2d1-fb083bd02055
date added to LUP
2018-04-26 15:33:28
date last changed
2024-02-13 19:36:03
@article{4e319416-9214-4f5b-b2d1-fb083bd02055,
  abstract     = {{<p>We have previously shown that most patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) reported low degree of SLE-related pain. However, 24% of the patients reported high degree of SLE-related pain, more fatigue, anxiety and depression, and worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To explore SLE-related pain, the presence of long-standing widespread pain, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after 7 years. Sixty-four out of 84 patients participated in a 7-year follow-up of the original survey and completed the same questionnaires answered at inclusion: pain (VAS 100 mm), fatigue (MAF), HRQoL (SF-36), anxiety and depression (HADS), and, if appropriate, a pain-drawing. Differences between inclusion and follow-up (change) were calculated. The patients with a low degree of SLE-related pain at inclusion reported no changes at follow-up in pain and PROs except for worsening in physical function in SF-36, median change (IQR) 0 (− 10 to 5), p = 0.024. Half of the patients with high degree of pain at inclusion reported decreased pain at follow-up, median change (IQR) 45 (35 to 65), p = 0.021; fatigue, 8 (8 to 17), p = 0.018; anxiety, 4 (1 to 4), p = 0.035; and depression, 4 (2 to 5), p = 0.018 and improvements in most dimensions of SF-36. The remaining half of the patients reported no changes regarding pain and PROs except for a worsening in vitality in SF-36, 20 (15 to 35), p = 0.0018. All patients with remaining high level of pain indicated long-standing widespread pain. After 7 years, a subgroup of patients with SLE reported remaining high level of SLE-related pain and a high symptom burden, including long-standing widespread pain. Such patients require more observant attention to receive appropriate treatment.</p>}},
  author       = {{Waldheim, Eva and Ajeganova, Sofia and Bergman, Stefan and Frostegård, Johan and Welin, Elisabet}},
  issn         = {{0770-3198}},
  keywords     = {{Anxiety; Depression; Fatigue; Health-related quality of life; Pain; SLE}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{7}},
  pages        = {{1825--1834}},
  publisher    = {{Springer}},
  series       = {{Clinical Rheumatology}},
  title        = {{Variation in pain related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) : a 7-year follow-up study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-018-4079-1}},
  doi          = {{10.1007/s10067-018-4079-1}},
  volume       = {{37}},
  year         = {{2018}},
}