Advanced

Explaining own and others' behavior in a controversial issue: Animal experimentation.

Blom Kemdal, Anna LU and Montgomery, Henry (2001) In Journal of Social Psychology 141(6). p.693-713
Abstract
The authors investigated how 2 groups with different attitudes toward animal experimentation-- researchers who conducted animal experiments and members of animal welfare organizations who protested against animal experiments-- made attributions for the behavior of the opposing group. The 2 groups showed an actor-observer effect, mentioning more internal causes for the opponents' behavior and more external causes for their own behavior. Both groups were able to take the other's perspective, resulting in a reversed actor-observer effect. The less involved participants followed the pattern of ratings of the group whose attitudes corresponded to their own. In particular, the participants with a negative attitude toward animal experimentation... (More)
The authors investigated how 2 groups with different attitudes toward animal experimentation-- researchers who conducted animal experiments and members of animal welfare organizations who protested against animal experiments-- made attributions for the behavior of the opposing group. The 2 groups showed an actor-observer effect, mentioning more internal causes for the opponents' behavior and more external causes for their own behavior. Both groups were able to take the other's perspective, resulting in a reversed actor-observer effect. The less involved participants followed the pattern of ratings of the group whose attitudes corresponded to their own. In particular, the participants with a negative attitude toward animal experimentation rated researchers' behavior as more internally caused than did those with a positive attitude. The results illustrated how the participants formed and defended attitudes in a social context. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
animal experimentation, actor-observer effect, attitude, attribution
in
Journal of Social Psychology
volume
141
issue
6
pages
21 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035528381
ISSN
0022-4545
DOI
10.1080/00224540109600582
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4f730f7c-d87c-42e9-8d3e-88687ae1bff7
date added to LUP
2017-02-10 10:59:35
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:49:15
@article{4f730f7c-d87c-42e9-8d3e-88687ae1bff7,
  abstract     = {The authors investigated how 2 groups with different attitudes toward animal experimentation-- researchers who conducted animal experiments and members of animal welfare organizations who protested against animal experiments-- made attributions for the behavior of the opposing group. The 2 groups showed an actor-observer effect, mentioning more internal causes for the opponents' behavior and more external causes for their own behavior. Both groups were able to take the other's perspective, resulting in a reversed actor-observer effect. The less involved participants followed the pattern of ratings of the group whose attitudes corresponded to their own. In particular, the participants with a negative attitude toward animal experimentation rated researchers' behavior as more internally caused than did those with a positive attitude. The results illustrated how the participants formed and defended attitudes in a social context. },
  articleno    = {2002-00656-001},
  author       = {Blom Kemdal, Anna and Montgomery, Henry},
  issn         = {0022-4545},
  keyword      = {animal experimentation,actor-observer effect,attitude,attribution},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {693--713},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Social Psychology},
  title        = {Explaining own and others' behavior in a controversial issue: Animal experimentation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224540109600582},
  volume       = {141},
  year         = {2001},
}