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A modified caseload midwifery model for women with fear of birth, women's and midwives' experiences : A qualitative study

Larsson, Birgitta ; Rubertsson, Christine LU and Hildingsson, Ingegerd (2020) In Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare 24. p.1-6
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although fear of birth is common during pregnancy and childbirth, the best treatment for fear of birth in clinical care remain unclear. Strong evidence suggests that continuity models of midwifery care can benefit women and birth outcomes, though such models are rare in Sweden. Because women with fear of birth could benefit from such models, the aim of this qualitative study was to examine how women with fear of birth and their midwives experienced care in a modified caseload midwifery model.

METHODS: A qualitative interview study using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a pilot study in which women assessed to have fear of birth received antenatal and intrapartum care, from a midwife whom they knew.... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Although fear of birth is common during pregnancy and childbirth, the best treatment for fear of birth in clinical care remain unclear. Strong evidence suggests that continuity models of midwifery care can benefit women and birth outcomes, though such models are rare in Sweden. Because women with fear of birth could benefit from such models, the aim of this qualitative study was to examine how women with fear of birth and their midwives experienced care in a modified caseload midwifery model.

METHODS: A qualitative interview study using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a pilot study in which women assessed to have fear of birth received antenatal and intrapartum care, from a midwife whom they knew. Eight women and four midwives were interviewed.

RESULTS: An overarching theme-"A mutual relationship instilled a sense of peace and security"-and three themes-"Closeness, continuity, and trust," "Preparation and counselling," and "Security, confidence, and reduced fear"-reflect the views and experiences of women with fear of birth and their midwives after participating in a modified caseload midwifery model.

CONCLUSIONS: For both women with fear of birth and their midwives, the caseload midwifery model generated trustful woman-midwife relationships, which increased women's confidence, reduced their fear, and contributed to their positive birth experiences. Moreover, the midwives felt better equipped to address women's needs, and their way of working with the women became more holistic. Altogether, offering a continuity model of midwifery care could be an option to support women with fear of birth.

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author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare
volume
24
article number
100504
pages
1 - 6
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85080091572
  • pmid:32120329
ISSN
1877-5764
DOI
10.1016/j.srhc.2020.100504
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.
id
4fc93faf-7060-4024-899e-cd523323b510
date added to LUP
2020-04-01 16:16:47
date last changed
2024-01-16 22:27:20
@article{4fc93faf-7060-4024-899e-cd523323b510,
  abstract     = {{<p>OBJECTIVE: Although fear of birth is common during pregnancy and childbirth, the best treatment for fear of birth in clinical care remain unclear. Strong evidence suggests that continuity models of midwifery care can benefit women and birth outcomes, though such models are rare in Sweden. Because women with fear of birth could benefit from such models, the aim of this qualitative study was to examine how women with fear of birth and their midwives experienced care in a modified caseload midwifery model.</p><p>METHODS: A qualitative interview study using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a pilot study in which women assessed to have fear of birth received antenatal and intrapartum care, from a midwife whom they knew. Eight women and four midwives were interviewed.</p><p>RESULTS: An overarching theme-"A mutual relationship instilled a sense of peace and security"-and three themes-"Closeness, continuity, and trust," "Preparation and counselling," and "Security, confidence, and reduced fear"-reflect the views and experiences of women with fear of birth and their midwives after participating in a modified caseload midwifery model.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: For both women with fear of birth and their midwives, the caseload midwifery model generated trustful woman-midwife relationships, which increased women's confidence, reduced their fear, and contributed to their positive birth experiences. Moreover, the midwives felt better equipped to address women's needs, and their way of working with the women became more holistic. Altogether, offering a continuity model of midwifery care could be an option to support women with fear of birth.</p>}},
  author       = {{Larsson, Birgitta and Rubertsson, Christine and Hildingsson, Ingegerd}},
  issn         = {{1877-5764}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{1--6}},
  publisher    = {{Elsevier}},
  series       = {{Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare}},
  title        = {{A modified caseload midwifery model for women with fear of birth, women's and midwives' experiences : A qualitative study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.srhc.2020.100504}},
  doi          = {{10.1016/j.srhc.2020.100504}},
  volume       = {{24}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}