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Humanism and Normativism facet scales and short scales

Nilsson, Artur LU (2015) In Lund Psychological Reports 15(1).
Abstract
According to Polarity Theory, all ideologies are fundamentally polarized by a conflict between Humanism, which idealizes and glorifies humanity, and Normativism, which portrays human goodness and worth as contingent upon conformity and achievement. Humanism and Normativism have, however, turned out to be distinct worldviews rather than opposite ends of a single bipolar continuum. Introducing a hierarchical model of their structure and developing scales to measure each facet, I previously showed that they are

negatively related across views of human nature, interpersonal attitudes, and attitudes to affect, but not across epistemologies and political values. This report presents the eight-item facet scales and fifteen-item... (More)
According to Polarity Theory, all ideologies are fundamentally polarized by a conflict between Humanism, which idealizes and glorifies humanity, and Normativism, which portrays human goodness and worth as contingent upon conformity and achievement. Humanism and Normativism have, however, turned out to be distinct worldviews rather than opposite ends of a single bipolar continuum. Introducing a hierarchical model of their structure and developing scales to measure each facet, I previously showed that they are

negatively related across views of human nature, interpersonal attitudes, and attitudes to affect, but not across epistemologies and political values. This report presents the eight-item facet scales and fifteen-item short-measures of humanism and normativism, along with descriptive statistics for each item in US and Swedish samples. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
keywords
polarity theory, normativism, humanism, worldview, personal ideology
in
Lund Psychological Reports
volume
15(1)
pages
16 pages
publisher
Department of Psychology, Lund University
ISSN
1404-8035
DOI
10.13140/2.1.4324.9447
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
627ccaf9-d790-4d3a-8267-538347fa47f5 (old id 5142373)
alternative location
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/67013152/LPR/LPR_Volume1501.pdf
date added to LUP
2015-03-02 11:19:35
date last changed
2016-04-16 00:28:31
@techreport{627ccaf9-d790-4d3a-8267-538347fa47f5,
  abstract     = {According to Polarity Theory, all ideologies are fundamentally polarized by a conflict between Humanism, which idealizes and glorifies humanity, and Normativism, which portrays human goodness and worth as contingent upon conformity and achievement. Humanism and Normativism have, however, turned out to be distinct worldviews rather than opposite ends of a single bipolar continuum. Introducing a hierarchical model of their structure and developing scales to measure each facet, I previously showed that they are<br/><br>
negatively related across views of human nature, interpersonal attitudes, and attitudes to affect, but not across epistemologies and political values. This report presents the eight-item facet scales and fifteen-item short-measures of humanism and normativism, along with descriptive statistics for each item in US and Swedish samples.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Artur},
  institution  = {Department of Psychology, Lund University},
  issn         = {1404-8035},
  keyword      = {polarity theory,normativism,humanism,worldview,personal ideology},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {16},
  series       = {Lund Psychological Reports},
  title        = {Humanism and Normativism facet scales and short scales},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/2.1.4324.9447},
  volume       = {15(1)},
  year         = {2015},
}