Advanced

A Pediatric Bone Mass Scan has Poor Ability to Predict Peak Bone Mass: An 11-Year Prospective Study in 121 Children.

Buttazzoni, Christian LU ; Rosengren, Björn LU ; Karlsson, Caroline LU ; Dencker, Magnus LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2015) In Calcified Tissue International 96(5). p.379-388
Abstract
This 11-year prospective longitudinal study examined how a pre-pubertal pediatric bone mass scan predicts peak bone mass. We measured bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2)), and bone area (cm(2)) in femoral neck, total body and lumbar spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a population-based cohort including 65 boys and 56 girls. At baseline all participants were pre-pubertal with a mean age of 8 years (range 6-9), they were re-measured at a mean 11 years (range 10-12) later. The participants were then mean 19 years (range 18-19), an age range that corresponds to peak bone mass in femoral neck in our population. We calculated individual BMC, BMD, and bone size Z scores, using all participants at each... (More)
This 11-year prospective longitudinal study examined how a pre-pubertal pediatric bone mass scan predicts peak bone mass. We measured bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2)), and bone area (cm(2)) in femoral neck, total body and lumbar spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a population-based cohort including 65 boys and 56 girls. At baseline all participants were pre-pubertal with a mean age of 8 years (range 6-9), they were re-measured at a mean 11 years (range 10-12) later. The participants were then mean 19 years (range 18-19), an age range that corresponds to peak bone mass in femoral neck in our population. We calculated individual BMC, BMD, and bone size Z scores, using all participants at each measurement as reference and evaluated correlations between the two measurements. Individual Z scores were also stratified in quartiles to register movements between quartiles from pre-pubertal age to peak bone mass. The correlation coefficients (r) between pre-pubertal and young adulthood measurements for femoral neck BMC, BMD, and bone area varied between 0.37 and 0.65. The reached BMC value at age 8 years explained 42 % of the variance in the BMC peak value; the corresponding values for BMD were 31 % and bone area 14 %. Among the participants with femoral neck BMD in the lowest childhood quartile, 52 % had left this quartile at peak bone mass. A pediatric bone scan with a femoral neck BMD value in the lowest quartile had a sensitivity of 47 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 28, 66] and a specificity of 82 % (95 % CI 72, 89) to identify individuals who would remain in the lowest quartile at peak bone mass. The pre-pubertal femoral neck BMD explained only 31 % of the variance in femoral neck peak bone mass. A pre-pubertal BMD scan in a population-based sample has poor ability to predict individuals who are at risk of low peak bone mass. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Calcified Tissue International
volume
96
issue
5
pages
379 - 388
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:25716719
  • wos:000353890200002
  • scopus:84939975671
ISSN
1432-0827
DOI
10.1007/s00223-015-9965-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
804bf57a-f620-41bf-abb3-6a04e9f88558 (old id 5142668)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25716719?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-03-11 16:57:32
date last changed
2017-04-23 03:01:39
@article{804bf57a-f620-41bf-abb3-6a04e9f88558,
  abstract     = {This 11-year prospective longitudinal study examined how a pre-pubertal pediatric bone mass scan predicts peak bone mass. We measured bone mineral content (BMC; g), bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2)), and bone area (cm(2)) in femoral neck, total body and lumbar spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a population-based cohort including 65 boys and 56 girls. At baseline all participants were pre-pubertal with a mean age of 8 years (range 6-9), they were re-measured at a mean 11 years (range 10-12) later. The participants were then mean 19 years (range 18-19), an age range that corresponds to peak bone mass in femoral neck in our population. We calculated individual BMC, BMD, and bone size Z scores, using all participants at each measurement as reference and evaluated correlations between the two measurements. Individual Z scores were also stratified in quartiles to register movements between quartiles from pre-pubertal age to peak bone mass. The correlation coefficients (r) between pre-pubertal and young adulthood measurements for femoral neck BMC, BMD, and bone area varied between 0.37 and 0.65. The reached BMC value at age 8 years explained 42 % of the variance in the BMC peak value; the corresponding values for BMD were 31 % and bone area 14 %. Among the participants with femoral neck BMD in the lowest childhood quartile, 52 % had left this quartile at peak bone mass. A pediatric bone scan with a femoral neck BMD value in the lowest quartile had a sensitivity of 47 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 28, 66] and a specificity of 82 % (95 % CI 72, 89) to identify individuals who would remain in the lowest quartile at peak bone mass. The pre-pubertal femoral neck BMD explained only 31 % of the variance in femoral neck peak bone mass. A pre-pubertal BMD scan in a population-based sample has poor ability to predict individuals who are at risk of low peak bone mass.},
  author       = {Buttazzoni, Christian and Rosengren, Björn and Karlsson, Caroline and Dencker, Magnus and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1432-0827},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {379--388},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Calcified Tissue International},
  title        = {A Pediatric Bone Mass Scan has Poor Ability to Predict Peak Bone Mass: An 11-Year Prospective Study in 121 Children.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00223-015-9965-9},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2015},
}