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Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on pattern separation

Svensson, Maria LU ; Grahm, Matilda LU ; Ekstrand, Joakim LU ; Movahed Rad, Pouya LU ; Johansson, Mikael LU and Tingström, Anders LU (2015) In Hippocampus 25(11). p.1351-1360
Abstract
Strategies employing different techniques to inhibit or stimulate neurogenesis have implicated a role for adult-born neurons in the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs, as well as a role in memory formation.

Electroconvulsive seizures, an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, robustly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis but it is not known how this relates to either therapeutic efficacy or unwanted cognitive side effects. We hypothesized that the ECS-derived increase in adult-born neurons would manifest in improved pattern separation ability, a memory function that is believed to be both hippocampus-dependent and coupled to neurogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated neurogenesis in adult rats by treating them... (More)
Strategies employing different techniques to inhibit or stimulate neurogenesis have implicated a role for adult-born neurons in the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs, as well as a role in memory formation.

Electroconvulsive seizures, an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, robustly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis but it is not known how this relates to either therapeutic efficacy or unwanted cognitive side effects. We hypothesized that the ECS-derived increase in adult-born neurons would manifest in improved pattern separation ability, a memory function that is believed to be both hippocampus-dependent and coupled to neurogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated neurogenesis in adult rats by treating them with a series of ECS and compared their performances in a trial-unique delayed nonmatching-to-location task (TUNL) to a control group. TUNL performance was analyzed over a 12-week period, during which newly formed neurons differentiate and become functionally integrated in the hippocampal neurocircuitry. Task difficulty was manipulated by modifying the delay between sample and choice, and by varying the spatial similarity between target and distracter location. Although animals learned the task and improved the number of correct responses over time, ECS did not influence spatial pattern separation ability. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
pattern separation, neurogenesis, hippocampus, electroconvulsive, rat
in
Hippocampus
volume
25
issue
11
pages
1351 - 1360
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000363682300016
  • scopus:84946491868
  • pmid:25850383
ISSN
1050-9631
DOI
10.1002/hipo.22441
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e80236e3-298d-40dc-8141-6034dc4d57c7 (old id 5154161)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25850383
date added to LUP
2015-03-23 15:37:56
date last changed
2017-01-22 03:10:47
@article{e80236e3-298d-40dc-8141-6034dc4d57c7,
  abstract     = {Strategies employing different techniques to inhibit or stimulate neurogenesis have implicated a role for adult-born neurons in the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs, as well as a role in memory formation.<br/><br>
Electroconvulsive seizures, an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, robustly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis but it is not known how this relates to either therapeutic efficacy or unwanted cognitive side effects. We hypothesized that the ECS-derived increase in adult-born neurons would manifest in improved pattern separation ability, a memory function that is believed to be both hippocampus-dependent and coupled to neurogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated neurogenesis in adult rats by treating them with a series of ECS and compared their performances in a trial-unique delayed nonmatching-to-location task (TUNL) to a control group. TUNL performance was analyzed over a 12-week period, during which newly formed neurons differentiate and become functionally integrated in the hippocampal neurocircuitry. Task difficulty was manipulated by modifying the delay between sample and choice, and by varying the spatial similarity between target and distracter location. Although animals learned the task and improved the number of correct responses over time, ECS did not influence spatial pattern separation ability.},
  author       = {Svensson, Maria and Grahm, Matilda and Ekstrand, Joakim and Movahed Rad, Pouya and Johansson, Mikael and Tingström, Anders},
  issn         = {1050-9631},
  keyword      = {pattern separation,neurogenesis,hippocampus,electroconvulsive,rat},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1351--1360},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Hippocampus},
  title        = {Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on pattern separation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hipo.22441},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2015},
}