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A winning strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialisation

Stanfors, Maria LU and Eriksson, Björn LU (2015) In Business History 57(7). p.988-1004
Abstract
Why do certain firms prosper and grow old while other firms fail? Established knowledge tells us that longevity is related to the firm's ability to adapt to market conditions, through product diversification, learning-by-doing and adopting new strategies regarding technology, human resources and management. By estimating duration models using new data covering the entire Swedish tobacco industry, we find that firms employing more women were considerably less likely to fail than other firms. Industry feminisation may be seen as the outcome of a competitive process where more feminised firms as a result of their extended longevity came to dominate the industry.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
firm survival, longevity, competing risks, competition, female employment
in
Business History
volume
57
issue
7
pages
988 - 1004
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000360612700003
  • scopus:84940897573
ISSN
0007-6791
DOI
10.1080/00076791.2014.993615
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bbb20ffa-1d97-43e9-83b8-beb447905a29 (old id 5159896)
date added to LUP
2015-03-24 10:25:53
date last changed
2017-06-04 03:00:22
@article{bbb20ffa-1d97-43e9-83b8-beb447905a29,
  abstract     = {Why do certain firms prosper and grow old while other firms fail? Established knowledge tells us that longevity is related to the firm's ability to adapt to market conditions, through product diversification, learning-by-doing and adopting new strategies regarding technology, human resources and management. By estimating duration models using new data covering the entire Swedish tobacco industry, we find that firms employing more women were considerably less likely to fail than other firms. Industry feminisation may be seen as the outcome of a competitive process where more feminised firms as a result of their extended longevity came to dominate the industry.},
  author       = {Stanfors, Maria and Eriksson, Björn},
  issn         = {0007-6791},
  keyword      = {firm survival,longevity,competing risks,competition,female employment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {988--1004},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Business History},
  title        = {A winning strategy? The employment of women and firm longevity during industrialisation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2014.993615},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2015},
}