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Session proposal - Technical progress and its challenges for the labour law: wages, work organization and new forms of job.

Fusco, Federico LU (2018) ASTRIL Second International Conference
Abstract
This is a proposal to organize a session.

Description:
The rapid development of the technological progress is constantly reshaping the organization of the firm, raising important labour law issues.
One of the red treads of this phenomenon is the shifting of the focus from the “activity” performed by the worker, to the “result” obtained.
In the past it was not always possible to measure the output produced by the single worker (with the exception of some sectors of the industrial production) and, than, the only way to measure the labour activity was its duration.
Nowadays, instead, the technology has enhanced the possibility to measure the effective output, thus pushing the employers to anchor to it the pay and... (More)
This is a proposal to organize a session.

Description:
The rapid development of the technological progress is constantly reshaping the organization of the firm, raising important labour law issues.
One of the red treads of this phenomenon is the shifting of the focus from the “activity” performed by the worker, to the “result” obtained.
In the past it was not always possible to measure the output produced by the single worker (with the exception of some sectors of the industrial production) and, than, the only way to measure the labour activity was its duration.
Nowadays, instead, the technology has enhanced the possibility to measure the effective output, thus pushing the employers to anchor to it the pay and other important aspect of the labour relation.
For this reason the worker is moving from a situation in which he had to give to the employer the availability of his time and working skills, to a new order in which he is always more required to obtain a certain output.
This phenomenon can be clearly observed in the so called “gig economy”, where a complex activity is split in a series of smaller ones, which are then allocated among different contractors. Those contractors are obliged to obtain a precise goal and, also because of this commitment, are often classified as autonomous workers.
Inside the labour relation, instead, the described process allows the employer to more extensively monitor the worker and this under the justification to enhance productivity or to prevent a misuse by the worker of the (often very versatile) technological devices.
The balance between the power of control and the right to privacy is, thus, an actual issue and the entry into force of the EU Reg. 679/2016 imposes a deeper analysis of it.
Finally the technological progress interests also the wages, which in the last years have been stagnant in spite of an increase of productivity. Moreover the classification of the gig economy workers as self-employee raises important questions concerning the minimum wage level and its determination process.
Moving from all the abovementioned remarks this panel aims to offer a comprehensive analysis of the enlisted issues, thanks to four presentations that will focus on the following topics:
-technical progress and worker’s privacy in the digitalized firm;
-technical progress and new forms of jobs in Sweden;
-technical progress and new forms of jobs in Italy;
-institutional frame in advanced economy: do we need minimum wages? the case of Denmark;
The choice of both the subjects and the presenters, coming from different parts of Europe, aims to provide a broad analysis of the topic, matching experiences and practices that are expression of different economic and social contexts, but at the same time present common aspects which are extremely interesting under a comparative perspective.
(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
privacy, gig economy, web work, minimum wage, italy, sweden, Denmark
conference name
ASTRIL Second International Conference
conference location
Rome, Italy
conference dates
2018-12-13 - 2018-12-14
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
51f8631e-834a-4f02-9022-c47c396cd7fc
date added to LUP
2018-08-30 14:41:43
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:41:19
@misc{51f8631e-834a-4f02-9022-c47c396cd7fc,
  abstract     = {This is a proposal to organize a session.<br/><br/>Description:<br/>The rapid development of the technological progress is constantly reshaping the organization of the firm, raising important labour law issues.<br/>One of the red treads of this phenomenon is the shifting of the focus from the “activity” performed by the worker, to the “result” obtained.<br/>In the past it was not always possible to measure the output produced by the single worker (with the exception of some sectors of the industrial production) and, than, the only way to measure the labour activity was its duration.<br/>Nowadays, instead, the technology has enhanced the possibility to measure the effective output, thus pushing the employers to anchor to it the pay and other important aspect of the labour relation. <br/>For this reason the worker is moving from a situation in which he had to give to the employer the availability of his time and working skills, to a new order in which he is always more required to obtain a certain output.<br/>This phenomenon can be clearly observed in the so called “gig economy”, where a complex activity is split in a series of smaller ones, which are then allocated among different contractors. Those contractors are obliged to obtain a precise goal and, also because of this commitment, are often classified as autonomous workers.<br/>Inside the labour relation, instead, the described process allows the employer to more extensively monitor the worker and this under the justification to enhance productivity or to prevent a misuse by the worker of the (often very versatile) technological devices.<br/>The balance between the power of control and the right to privacy is, thus, an actual issue and the entry into force of the EU Reg. 679/2016 imposes a deeper analysis of it.<br/>Finally the technological progress interests also the wages, which in the last years have been stagnant in spite of an increase of productivity. Moreover the classification of the gig economy workers as self-employee raises important questions concerning the minimum wage level and its determination process.<br/>Moving from all the abovementioned remarks this panel aims to offer a comprehensive analysis of the enlisted issues, thanks to four presentations that will focus on the following topics:<br/>-technical progress and worker’s privacy in the digitalized firm;<br/>-technical progress and new forms of jobs in Sweden;<br/>-technical progress and new forms of jobs in Italy;<br/>-institutional frame in advanced economy: do we need minimum wages? the case of Denmark;<br/>The choice of both the subjects and the presenters, coming from different parts of Europe, aims to provide a broad analysis of the topic, matching experiences and practices that are expression of different economic and social contexts, but at the same time present common aspects which are extremely interesting under a comparative perspective.<br/>},
  author       = {Fusco, Federico},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  title        = {Session proposal - Technical progress and its challenges for the labour law: wages, work organization and new forms of job.},
  year         = {2018},
}