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Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding between leptin and its receptor

Jönsson, Tommy LU ; Memon, Ashfaque LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Olsson, Stefan; Nalla, Amarnadh; Bauer, Mikael LU and Linse, Sara LU (2015) In BMC Biochemistry 16.
Abstract
Background: Leptin resistance is considered a primary risk factor for obesity. It has been hypothesized that dietary cereal grain protein could cause leptin resistance by preventing leptin from binding to its receptor. Non-degraded dietary wheat protein has been found in human serum at a mean level of 41 ng/mL. Here, we report our findings from testing whether enzymatically digested gluten from wheat prevents leptin from binding to the leptin receptor in vitro. Gluten from wheat was digested with pepsin and trypsin under physiological conditions. Pepsin and trypsin activity was removed from the gluten digest with a 10 kDa spin-filter or by heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 min. Binding to the leptin receptor of leptin mixed with... (More)
Background: Leptin resistance is considered a primary risk factor for obesity. It has been hypothesized that dietary cereal grain protein could cause leptin resistance by preventing leptin from binding to its receptor. Non-degraded dietary wheat protein has been found in human serum at a mean level of 41 ng/mL. Here, we report our findings from testing whether enzymatically digested gluten from wheat prevents leptin from binding to the leptin receptor in vitro. Gluten from wheat was digested with pepsin and trypsin under physiological conditions. Pepsin and trypsin activity was removed from the gluten digest with a 10 kDa spin-filter or by heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 min. Binding to the leptin receptor of leptin mixed with gluten digest at a series of concentrations was measured using surface plasmon resonance technology. Results: Binding of the gluten digest to the leptin receptor was not detected. Spin-filtered gluten digest inhibited binding of leptin to the leptin receptor, with 50% inhibition at a gluten digest concentration of similar to 10 ng/mL. Heat-treated gluten digest did not inhibit leptin binding. Conclusions: Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding of leptin to the leptin receptor, with half-maximal inhibition at 10 ng/mL. The inhibition is significant at clinically relevant concentrations and could therefore serve as a novel pathway to investigate to understand the molecular basis of leptin resistance, obesity and associated disorders. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Gluten, Leptin, Leptin resistance, Obesity
in
BMC Biochemistry
volume
16
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000349131400001
  • scopus:84923934641
ISSN
1471-2091
DOI
10.1186/s12858-015-0032-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d895cc80-cc54-4265-841d-e9bd4f5fd3e4 (old id 5201254)
date added to LUP
2015-04-01 07:36:59
date last changed
2017-01-08 04:16:13
@article{d895cc80-cc54-4265-841d-e9bd4f5fd3e4,
  abstract     = {Background: Leptin resistance is considered a primary risk factor for obesity. It has been hypothesized that dietary cereal grain protein could cause leptin resistance by preventing leptin from binding to its receptor. Non-degraded dietary wheat protein has been found in human serum at a mean level of 41 ng/mL. Here, we report our findings from testing whether enzymatically digested gluten from wheat prevents leptin from binding to the leptin receptor in vitro. Gluten from wheat was digested with pepsin and trypsin under physiological conditions. Pepsin and trypsin activity was removed from the gluten digest with a 10 kDa spin-filter or by heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 min. Binding to the leptin receptor of leptin mixed with gluten digest at a series of concentrations was measured using surface plasmon resonance technology. Results: Binding of the gluten digest to the leptin receptor was not detected. Spin-filtered gluten digest inhibited binding of leptin to the leptin receptor, with 50% inhibition at a gluten digest concentration of similar to 10 ng/mL. Heat-treated gluten digest did not inhibit leptin binding. Conclusions: Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding of leptin to the leptin receptor, with half-maximal inhibition at 10 ng/mL. The inhibition is significant at clinically relevant concentrations and could therefore serve as a novel pathway to investigate to understand the molecular basis of leptin resistance, obesity and associated disorders.},
  articleno    = {3},
  author       = {Jönsson, Tommy and Memon, Ashfaque and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Olsson, Stefan and Nalla, Amarnadh and Bauer, Mikael and Linse, Sara},
  issn         = {1471-2091},
  keyword      = {Gluten,Leptin,Leptin resistance,Obesity},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Biochemistry},
  title        = {Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding between leptin and its receptor},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12858-015-0032-y},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2015},
}