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TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN HYBRID IMAGING AND IMPACT ON DOSE.

Mattsson, Sören LU ; Andersson, Martin LU and Söderberg, Marcus LU (2015) In Radiation Protection Dosimetry 165(1-4). p.410-415
Abstract
New imaging technologies utilising X-rays and radiopharmaceuticals have developed rapidly. Clinical application of computed tomography (CT) has revolutionised medical imaging and plays an enormous role in medical care. Due to technical improvements, spatial, contrast and temporal resolutions have continuously improved. In spite of significant reduction of CT doses during recent years, CT is still a dominating source of radiation exposure to the population. Combinations with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) and especially the use of SPECT/CT and PET/CT, provide important additional information about physiology as well as cellular and molecular events. However, significant dose... (More)
New imaging technologies utilising X-rays and radiopharmaceuticals have developed rapidly. Clinical application of computed tomography (CT) has revolutionised medical imaging and plays an enormous role in medical care. Due to technical improvements, spatial, contrast and temporal resolutions have continuously improved. In spite of significant reduction of CT doses during recent years, CT is still a dominating source of radiation exposure to the population. Combinations with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) and especially the use of SPECT/CT and PET/CT, provide important additional information about physiology as well as cellular and molecular events. However, significant dose contributions from SPECT and PET occur, making PET/CT and SPECT/CT truly high dose procedures. More research should be done to find optimal activities of radiopharmaceuticals for various patient groups and investigations. The implementation of simple protocol adjustments, including individually based administration, encouraged hydration, forced diuresis and use of optimised voiding intervals, laxatives, etc., can reduce the radiation exposure to the patients. New data about staff doses to fingers, hands and eye lenses indicate that finger doses could be a problem, but not doses to the eye lenses and to the whole body. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Radiation Protection Dosimetry
volume
165
issue
1-4
pages
410 - 415
publisher
Nuclear Technology Publishing
external identifiers
  • pmid:25802466
  • wos:000358449300090
  • scopus:84939556287
  • pmid:26468253
  • scopus:84960153334
  • wos:000371607500018
ISSN
1742-3406
DOI
10.1093/rpd/ncv024
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c46556e4-30b5-4315-808a-0ef25256ea0a (old id 5257776)
date added to LUP
2015-04-05 13:27:18
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:03:14
@article{c46556e4-30b5-4315-808a-0ef25256ea0a,
  abstract     = {New imaging technologies utilising X-rays and radiopharmaceuticals have developed rapidly. Clinical application of computed tomography (CT) has revolutionised medical imaging and plays an enormous role in medical care. Due to technical improvements, spatial, contrast and temporal resolutions have continuously improved. In spite of significant reduction of CT doses during recent years, CT is still a dominating source of radiation exposure to the population. Combinations with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) and especially the use of SPECT/CT and PET/CT, provide important additional information about physiology as well as cellular and molecular events. However, significant dose contributions from SPECT and PET occur, making PET/CT and SPECT/CT truly high dose procedures. More research should be done to find optimal activities of radiopharmaceuticals for various patient groups and investigations. The implementation of simple protocol adjustments, including individually based administration, encouraged hydration, forced diuresis and use of optimised voiding intervals, laxatives, etc., can reduce the radiation exposure to the patients. New data about staff doses to fingers, hands and eye lenses indicate that finger doses could be a problem, but not doses to the eye lenses and to the whole body.},
  author       = {Mattsson, Sören and Andersson, Martin and Söderberg, Marcus},
  issn         = {1742-3406},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {410--415},
  publisher    = {Nuclear Technology Publishing},
  series       = {Radiation Protection Dosimetry},
  title        = {TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN HYBRID IMAGING AND IMPACT ON DOSE.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/ncv024},
  volume       = {165},
  year         = {2015},
}