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What’s the point of going to school? A longitudinal study of reading and writing development of students differing in linguistic abilities

Nauclér, Kerstin LU and Magnusson, Eva LU (2002) In Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics 50.
Abstract
At the first Nordic meeting for linguists with a research interest in reading and writing, held in Løgumkloster, Denmark, in 1987, we reported on a longitudinal study we had just started. The aim of the study was to find out which kind of linguistic disabilities are the most damaging for the development of reading and writing (Magnusson & Nauclér 1990 a, b). When reading is looked upon as a linguistic skill to the same extent as speaking and listening, it is logical to find a majority of children with language impairments among students with reading and writing difficulties. However, all children diagnosed as language-impaired do not experience such problems at school. Since it was not obvious what kind of language problems were the... (More)
At the first Nordic meeting for linguists with a research interest in reading and writing, held in Løgumkloster, Denmark, in 1987, we reported on a longitudinal study we had just started. The aim of the study was to find out which kind of linguistic disabilities are the most damaging for the development of reading and writing (Magnusson & Nauclér 1990 a, b). When reading is looked upon as a linguistic skill to the same extent as speaking and listening, it is logical to find a majority of children with language impairments among students with reading and writing difficulties. However, all children diagnosed as language-impaired do not experience such problems at school. Since it was not obvious what kind of language problems were the most troublesome for the development of reading and writing, it was not possible to predict which language-impaired children were most at risk. This was the rationale for the longitudinal study in which we have followed the language development of impaired and normal children in pre-school, from the age of 6, until grade 12, when they are 18, in order to compare their linguistic and metalinguistic abilities in pre-school (i.e. before they were taught to read and write) with their development of reading and writing during the school years. This paper will focus on the school’s possibility to decrease the gap between students with and without language impairment. After presenting the subjects and the tests, we will give a short description of the subjects’ oral and written language development in the first school years, and then a more detailed account of the outcome of the final tests when the subjects were about to leave school. (Less)
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Working Paper
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in
Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics
volume
50
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e3b8bb33-7243-4923-96cf-7a8cc8d4f298 (old id 529047)
alternative location
http://www.ling.lu.se/disseminations/pdf/50/Naucler_Magnusson.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-09-28 07:13:13
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:46:23
@misc{e3b8bb33-7243-4923-96cf-7a8cc8d4f298,
  abstract     = {At the first Nordic meeting for linguists with a research interest in reading and writing, held in Løgumkloster, Denmark, in 1987, we reported on a longitudinal study we had just started. The aim of the study was to find out which kind of linguistic disabilities are the most damaging for the development of reading and writing (Magnusson & Nauclér 1990 a, b). When reading is looked upon as a linguistic skill to the same extent as speaking and listening, it is logical to find a majority of children with language impairments among students with reading and writing difficulties. However, all children diagnosed as language-impaired do not experience such problems at school. Since it was not obvious what kind of language problems were the most troublesome for the development of reading and writing, it was not possible to predict which language-impaired children were most at risk. This was the rationale for the longitudinal study in which we have followed the language development of impaired and normal children in pre-school, from the age of 6, until grade 12, when they are 18, in order to compare their linguistic and metalinguistic abilities in pre-school (i.e. before they were taught to read and write) with their development of reading and writing during the school years. This paper will focus on the school’s possibility to decrease the gap between students with and without language impairment. After presenting the subjects and the tests, we will give a short description of the subjects’ oral and written language development in the first school years, and then a more detailed account of the outcome of the final tests when the subjects were about to leave school.},
  author       = {Nauclér, Kerstin and Magnusson, Eva},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Working Paper},
  series       = {Working Papers, Lund University, Dept. of Linguistics},
  title        = {What’s the point of going to school? A longitudinal study of reading and writing development of students differing in linguistic abilities},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2002},
}