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Conflicts in adaptation : Case studies from Nepal and the Maldives

Phudoma, Lama LU and Becker, Per LU (2019) In Disaster Prevention and Management 28(3). p.304-318
Abstract
Purpose – Adaptation appears to be regarded as a panacea in policy circles to reduce the risk of impending crises resulting from contemporary changes, including but not restricted to climate change. Such conceptions can be problematic, generally assuming adaptation as an entirely positive and non-conflictual process. The purpose of this paper is to challenge such uncritical views, drawing attention to the conflictual nature of adaptation, and propose a theoretical framework facilitating the identification and analysis of conflicts in adaptation. Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on case study research using first-hand narratives of adaptation in Nepal and the Maldives collected using qualitative interviews, participant... (More)
Purpose – Adaptation appears to be regarded as a panacea in policy circles to reduce the risk of impending crises resulting from contemporary changes, including but not restricted to climate change. Such conceptions can be problematic, generally assuming adaptation as an entirely positive and non-conflictual process. The purpose of this paper is to challenge such uncritical views, drawing attention to the conflictual nature of adaptation, and propose a theoretical framework facilitating the identification and analysis of conflicts in adaptation. Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on case study research using first-hand narratives of adaptation in Nepal and the Maldives collected using qualitative interviews, participant observation and document analysis.
Findings – The findings identify conflicts between actors in, and around, communities that are adapting to changes. These conflicts can be categorized along three dimensions: qualitative differences in the type of conflict, the relative position of conflicting actors and the degree of manifestation of the conflict. Originality/value – The three-dimensional Adaptation Conflict Framework facilitate analysis of conflicts in adaptation, allowing for a critical examination of subjectivities inherent in the adaptation discourses embedded in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation research and policy. Such an inquiry is crucial for interventions supporting community adaptation to reduce disaster risk. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adaptation, Conflict, Nepal, The Maldives
in
Disaster Prevention and Management
volume
28
issue
3
pages
304 - 318
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063798390
ISSN
0965-3562
DOI
10.1108/DPM-12-2018-0393
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52f055c7-fa72-4361-811b-9f62d3f644ae
date added to LUP
2019-04-08 17:45:23
date last changed
2019-06-28 07:58:38
@article{52f055c7-fa72-4361-811b-9f62d3f644ae,
  abstract     = {Purpose – Adaptation appears to be regarded as a panacea in policy circles to reduce the risk of impending crises resulting from contemporary changes, including but not restricted to climate change. Such conceptions can be problematic, generally assuming adaptation as an entirely positive and non-conflictual process. The purpose of this paper is to challenge such uncritical views, drawing attention to the conflictual nature of adaptation, and propose a theoretical framework facilitating the identification and analysis of conflicts in adaptation. Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on case study research using first-hand narratives of adaptation in Nepal and the Maldives collected using qualitative interviews, participant observation and document analysis.<br/>Findings – The findings identify conflicts between actors in, and around, communities that are adapting to changes. These conflicts can be categorized along three dimensions: qualitative differences in the type of conflict, the relative position of conflicting actors and the degree of manifestation of the conflict. Originality/value – The three-dimensional Adaptation Conflict Framework facilitate analysis of conflicts in adaptation, allowing for a critical examination of subjectivities inherent in the adaptation discourses embedded in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation research and policy. Such an inquiry is crucial for interventions supporting community adaptation to reduce disaster risk.},
  author       = {Phudoma, Lama and Becker, Per},
  issn         = {0965-3562},
  keyword      = {Adaptation,Conflict,Nepal,The Maldives},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {304--318},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Disaster Prevention and Management},
  title        = {Conflicts in adaptation : Case studies from Nepal and the Maldives},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/DPM-12-2018-0393},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2019},
}