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WozARd: A Wizard of Oz Method for Wearable Augmented Reality Interaction - A Pilot Study

Alce, Günter LU ; Wallergård, Mattias LU and Hermodsson, Klas (2015) In Advances in Human-Computer Interaction 2015.
Abstract
Head-mounted displays and other wearable devices open up for innovative types of interaction for wearable augmented reality (AR). However, to design and evaluate these new types of AR user interfaces, it is essential to quickly simulate undeveloped components of the system and collect feedback from potential users early in the design process. One way of doing this is the wizard of Oz (WOZ) method. The basic idea behind WOZ is to create the illusion of a working system by having a human operator, performing some or all of the system’s functions. WozARd is a WOZ method developed for wearable AR interaction. The presented pilot study was an initial investigation of the capability of the WozARd method to simulate an AR city tour. Qualitative... (More)
Head-mounted displays and other wearable devices open up for innovative types of interaction for wearable augmented reality (AR). However, to design and evaluate these new types of AR user interfaces, it is essential to quickly simulate undeveloped components of the system and collect feedback from potential users early in the design process. One way of doing this is the wizard of Oz (WOZ) method. The basic idea behind WOZ is to create the illusion of a working system by having a human operator, performing some or all of the system’s functions. WozARd is a WOZ method developed for wearable AR interaction. The presented pilot study was an initial investigation of the capability of the WozARd method to simulate an AR city tour. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 21 participants performing a simulated AR city tour. The data analysis focused on seven categories that can have an impact on how the WozARd method is perceived by participants: precision, relevance, responsiveness, technical stability, visual fidelity, general user-experience, and human-operator performance. Overall, the results indicate that the participants perceived the simulated AR city tour as a relatively realistic experience despite a certain degree of technical instability and human-operator mistakes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
volume
2015
publisher
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
external identifiers
  • scopus:84934932943
ISSN
1687-5893
DOI
10.1155/2015/271231
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
585b6799-02db-402f-8fe3-377e58db0cb9 (old id 5473530)
alternative location
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ahci/2015/271231/
date added to LUP
2015-06-16 09:34:39
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:13:37
@article{585b6799-02db-402f-8fe3-377e58db0cb9,
  abstract     = {Head-mounted displays and other wearable devices open up for innovative types of interaction for wearable augmented reality (AR). However, to design and evaluate these new types of AR user interfaces, it is essential to quickly simulate undeveloped components of the system and collect feedback from potential users early in the design process. One way of doing this is the wizard of Oz (WOZ) method. The basic idea behind WOZ is to create the illusion of a working system by having a human operator, performing some or all of the system’s functions. WozARd is a WOZ method developed for wearable AR interaction. The presented pilot study was an initial investigation of the capability of the WozARd method to simulate an AR city tour. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 21 participants performing a simulated AR city tour. The data analysis focused on seven categories that can have an impact on how the WozARd method is perceived by participants: precision, relevance, responsiveness, technical stability, visual fidelity, general user-experience, and human-operator performance. Overall, the results indicate that the participants perceived the simulated AR city tour as a relatively realistic experience despite a certain degree of technical instability and human-operator mistakes.},
  articleno    = {271231},
  author       = {Alce, Günter and Wallergård, Mattias and Hermodsson, Klas},
  issn         = {1687-5893},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Hindawi Publishing Corporation},
  series       = {Advances in Human-Computer Interaction},
  title        = {WozARd: A Wizard of Oz Method for Wearable Augmented Reality Interaction - A Pilot Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/271231},
  volume       = {2015},
  year         = {2015},
}