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Cancer risk in patients with hepatitis C virus infection : A population-based study in Sweden

Liu, Xiangdong LU ; Chen, Yanqing; Wang, Youxin; Dong, Xiaohua; Wang, Junming; Tang, Jianhua; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Ji, Jianguang LU (2017) In Cancer Medicine 6(5). p.1135-1140
Abstract

Increased risks of certain cancers have been observed in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, data on other cancer sites/types are lacking. We analyzed systematically the risk of developing 35 common cancers in patients with HCV infection using a nationwide Swedish database. Patients with HCV infection were identified from the Swedish Hospital Inpatient and Outpatient Register and Primary Health Care Database, and followed until the diagnosis of cancer. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent 35 common cancer sites/types between 1990 and 2010 in patients with HCV infection in Sweden. Increased risks were recorded for six cancers. The highest SIR was seen for liver cancer (36.67; 95% CI:... (More)

Increased risks of certain cancers have been observed in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, data on other cancer sites/types are lacking. We analyzed systematically the risk of developing 35 common cancers in patients with HCV infection using a nationwide Swedish database. Patients with HCV infection were identified from the Swedish Hospital Inpatient and Outpatient Register and Primary Health Care Database, and followed until the diagnosis of cancer. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent 35 common cancer sites/types between 1990 and 2010 in patients with HCV infection in Sweden. Increased risks were recorded for six cancers. The highest SIR was seen for liver cancer (36.67; 95% CI: 33.20-40.40). The decreased risk was for prostate cancer (0.73; 95% CI: 0.59-0.90) and melanoma (0.50; 95% CI: 0.30-0.79). A significant sex-difference for cancer was observed only for liver cancer (40.72; 95% CI: 36.36-45.45 for men and 27.21; 95% CI: 21.90-33.41 for women). Also, increased SIRs were noted only for liver cancer during the entire period of follow-up. HCV infection was associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer and additionally five other types of cancer. Active surveillance of other cancers may be needed in order to be diagnosed at an earlier stage.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cancer, Hepatitis C virus, Risk
in
Cancer Medicine
volume
6
issue
5
pages
1135 - 1140
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017445032
  • wos:000401330300025
ISSN
2045-7634
DOI
10.1002/cam4.988
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5597a44f-3366-4531-a673-119d074c90ea
date added to LUP
2017-05-02 15:30:22
date last changed
2018-03-04 05:01:26
@article{5597a44f-3366-4531-a673-119d074c90ea,
  abstract     = {<p>Increased risks of certain cancers have been observed in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, data on other cancer sites/types are lacking. We analyzed systematically the risk of developing 35 common cancers in patients with HCV infection using a nationwide Swedish database. Patients with HCV infection were identified from the Swedish Hospital Inpatient and Outpatient Register and Primary Health Care Database, and followed until the diagnosis of cancer. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent 35 common cancer sites/types between 1990 and 2010 in patients with HCV infection in Sweden. Increased risks were recorded for six cancers. The highest SIR was seen for liver cancer (36.67; 95% CI: 33.20-40.40). The decreased risk was for prostate cancer (0.73; 95% CI: 0.59-0.90) and melanoma (0.50; 95% CI: 0.30-0.79). A significant sex-difference for cancer was observed only for liver cancer (40.72; 95% CI: 36.36-45.45 for men and 27.21; 95% CI: 21.90-33.41 for women). Also, increased SIRs were noted only for liver cancer during the entire period of follow-up. HCV infection was associated with an increased incidence of liver cancer and additionally five other types of cancer. Active surveillance of other cancers may be needed in order to be diagnosed at an earlier stage.</p>},
  author       = {Liu, Xiangdong and Chen, Yanqing and Wang, Youxin and Dong, Xiaohua and Wang, Junming and Tang, Jianhua and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Ji, Jianguang},
  issn         = {2045-7634},
  keyword      = {Cancer,Hepatitis C virus,Risk},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1135--1140},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Cancer Medicine},
  title        = {Cancer risk in patients with hepatitis C virus infection : A population-based study in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.988},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2017},
}