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Examining Pauses in Writing: Theory, Methods and Empirical Data

Wengelin, Åsa (2006) 18. p.107-130
Abstract
Abstract in Undetermined
This chapter will address both theoretical and methodological issues in pause analysis. First, the theoretical assumptions concerning how pause analysis can contribute towards our understanding of written language production are discussed. Subsequently, some measures, methods and tools for automatic pause analysis are presented and some empirical analyses are given. Most of the analyses and tools presented will be based on the concept of a "micro-context". A micro-context is defined here as the context around a certain transition between two keystrokes. By categorising micro-contexts in terms of categories such as "within word", "between words", "between letter and punctuation mark", pause frequencies and... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined
This chapter will address both theoretical and methodological issues in pause analysis. First, the theoretical assumptions concerning how pause analysis can contribute towards our understanding of written language production are discussed. Subsequently, some measures, methods and tools for automatic pause analysis are presented and some empirical analyses are given. Most of the analyses and tools presented will be based on the concept of a "micro-context". A micro-context is defined here as the context around a certain transition between two keystrokes. By categorising micro-contexts in terms of categories such as "within word", "between words", "between letter and punctuation mark", pause frequencies and durations in certain types of micro-contexts can easily be analysed automatically and we can quickly gain an impression of how writers use their pauses. Finally, the complexity of pause definitions and operationalisations of the same are addressed. In typing, each letter is produced as a discrete unit and each transition between two keystrokes is a possible candidate for a pause because there will always be a short inactivity between keystrokes. However, obviously not every transition should be defined as a pause. Intuitively, a pause is a transition time between two keystrokes, which is longer than what can be expected for the time needed to merely find the next key. To make a pause writers have to "interrupt" their typing considerably longer than the "normal" transition time between two keystrokes. The problem is how to define a good pause criterion, taking into account the different typing speeds of individual writers. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
host publication
Computer key-stroke logging and writing: methods and applications (Studies in Writing)
editor
Sullivan, Kirk and Lindgren, Eva
volume
18
pages
107 - 130
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000274201000007
ISSN
1572-6304
ISBN
0-08-044934-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Linguistics and Phonetics (015010003)
id
4f38448c-1fcd-41d2-9950-1de0bb919483 (old id 574986)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 15:25:06
date last changed
2021-03-22 14:53:51
@inbook{4f38448c-1fcd-41d2-9950-1de0bb919483,
  abstract     = {Abstract in Undetermined<br/>This chapter will address both theoretical and methodological issues in pause analysis. First, the theoretical assumptions concerning how pause analysis can contribute towards our understanding of written language production are discussed. Subsequently, some measures, methods and tools for automatic pause analysis are presented and some empirical analyses are given. Most of the analyses and tools presented will be based on the concept of a "micro-context". A micro-context is defined here as the context around a certain transition between two keystrokes. By categorising micro-contexts in terms of categories such as "within word", "between words", "between letter and punctuation mark", pause frequencies and durations in certain types of micro-contexts can easily be analysed automatically and we can quickly gain an impression of how writers use their pauses. Finally, the complexity of pause definitions and operationalisations of the same are addressed. In typing, each letter is produced as a discrete unit and each transition between two keystrokes is a possible candidate for a pause because there will always be a short inactivity between keystrokes. However, obviously not every transition should be defined as a pause. Intuitively, a pause is a transition time between two keystrokes, which is longer than what can be expected for the time needed to merely find the next key. To make a pause writers have to "interrupt" their typing considerably longer than the "normal" transition time between two keystrokes. The problem is how to define a good pause criterion, taking into account the different typing speeds of individual writers.},
  author       = {Wengelin, Åsa},
  booktitle    = {Computer key-stroke logging and writing: methods and applications (Studies in Writing)},
  editor       = {Sullivan, Kirk and Lindgren, Eva},
  isbn         = {0-08-044934-4},
  issn         = {1572-6304},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {107--130},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  title        = {Examining Pauses in Writing: Theory, Methods and Empirical Data},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2006},
}