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Sensory Feedback in Hand Prostheses : A Prospective Study of Everyday Use

Wijk, Ulrika LU ; Carlsson, Ingela K. LU ; Antfolk, Christian LU ; Björkman, Anders LU and Rosén, Birgitta LU (2020) In Frontiers in Neuroscience 14.
Abstract

Introduction: Sensory feedback in hand prostheses is lacking but wished for. Many amputees experience a phantom hand map on their residual forearm. When the phantom hand map is touched, it is experienced as touch on the amputated hand. A non-invasive sensory feedback system, applicable to existing hand prostheses, can transfer somatotopical sensory information via phantom hand map. The aim was to evaluate how forearm amputees experienced a non-invasive sensory feedback system used in daily life over a 4-week period. Methods: This longitudinal cohort study included seven forearm amputees. A non-invasive sensory feedback system was used over 4 weeks. For analysis, a mixed method was used, including quantitative tests (ACMC, proprioceptive... (More)

Introduction: Sensory feedback in hand prostheses is lacking but wished for. Many amputees experience a phantom hand map on their residual forearm. When the phantom hand map is touched, it is experienced as touch on the amputated hand. A non-invasive sensory feedback system, applicable to existing hand prostheses, can transfer somatotopical sensory information via phantom hand map. The aim was to evaluate how forearm amputees experienced a non-invasive sensory feedback system used in daily life over a 4-week period. Methods: This longitudinal cohort study included seven forearm amputees. A non-invasive sensory feedback system was used over 4 weeks. For analysis, a mixed method was used, including quantitative tests (ACMC, proprioceptive pointing task, questionnaire) and interviews. A directed content analysis with predefined categories sensory feedback from the prosthesis, agency, body ownership, performance in activity, and suggestions for improvements was applied. Results: The results from interviews showed that sensory feedback was experienced as a feeling of touch which contributed to an experience of completeness. However, the results from the questionnaire showed that the sense of agency and performance remained unchanged or deteriorated. The ability to feel and manipulate small objects was difficult and a stronger feedback was wished for. Phantom pain was alleviated in four out of five patients. Conclusion: This is the first time a non-invasive sensory feedback system for hand prostheses was implemented in the home environment. The qualitative and quantitative results diverged. The sensory feedback was experienced as a feeling of touch which contributed to a feeling of completeness, linked to body ownership. The qualitative result was not verified in the quantitative measurements. Clinical Trial Registration: Name: Evaluation of a Non-invasive Sensory Feedback System in Hand Prostheses. Date of registration: March 15, 2019. Date the first participant was enrolled: April 1, 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03876405 ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4140-7478.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
amputation, amputation stumps, artificial arm, sensory feedback, traumatic amputation, upper limb
in
Frontiers in Neuroscience
volume
14
article number
663
publisher
Frontiers
external identifiers
  • pmid:32733187
  • scopus:85088456682
ISSN
1662-4548
DOI
10.3389/fnins.2020.00663
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
59ef8ff1-49e2-4cc2-979d-75d7fa7c8410
date added to LUP
2020-08-04 11:29:10
date last changed
2020-08-12 09:09:25
@article{59ef8ff1-49e2-4cc2-979d-75d7fa7c8410,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Sensory feedback in hand prostheses is lacking but wished for. Many amputees experience a phantom hand map on their residual forearm. When the phantom hand map is touched, it is experienced as touch on the amputated hand. A non-invasive sensory feedback system, applicable to existing hand prostheses, can transfer somatotopical sensory information via phantom hand map. The aim was to evaluate how forearm amputees experienced a non-invasive sensory feedback system used in daily life over a 4-week period. Methods: This longitudinal cohort study included seven forearm amputees. A non-invasive sensory feedback system was used over 4 weeks. For analysis, a mixed method was used, including quantitative tests (ACMC, proprioceptive pointing task, questionnaire) and interviews. A directed content analysis with predefined categories sensory feedback from the prosthesis, agency, body ownership, performance in activity, and suggestions for improvements was applied. Results: The results from interviews showed that sensory feedback was experienced as a feeling of touch which contributed to an experience of completeness. However, the results from the questionnaire showed that the sense of agency and performance remained unchanged or deteriorated. The ability to feel and manipulate small objects was difficult and a stronger feedback was wished for. Phantom pain was alleviated in four out of five patients. Conclusion: This is the first time a non-invasive sensory feedback system for hand prostheses was implemented in the home environment. The qualitative and quantitative results diverged. The sensory feedback was experienced as a feeling of touch which contributed to a feeling of completeness, linked to body ownership. The qualitative result was not verified in the quantitative measurements. Clinical Trial Registration: Name: Evaluation of a Non-invasive Sensory Feedback System in Hand Prostheses. Date of registration: March 15, 2019. Date the first participant was enrolled: April 1, 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03876405 ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4140-7478.</p>},
  author       = {Wijk, Ulrika and Carlsson, Ingela K. and Antfolk, Christian and Björkman, Anders and Rosén, Birgitta},
  issn         = {1662-4548},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Frontiers},
  series       = {Frontiers in Neuroscience},
  title        = {Sensory Feedback in Hand Prostheses : A Prospective Study of Everyday Use},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00663},
  doi          = {10.3389/fnins.2020.00663},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2020},
}