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Why do inhibitors develop? Principles of and factors influencing the risk for inhibitor development in haemophilia.

Astermark, Jan LU (2006) In Haemophilia 12 Suppl 3. p.52-60
Abstract
The formation of inhibitory alloantibodies is, in the postinfectious era, the most severe and costly complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia. The complexity of the immune response to the infused factor becomes more and more obvious as knowledge in the area increases. Antibodies develop as a result of a complex multi-factorial interaction between antigen-presenting cells, T- and B-lymphocytes. Genetic susceptibility of cell surface molecules, such as the major histocompatibility complex, the T-cell receptor and cytokine receptors, as well as various immunomodulatory molecules have a major impact on the outcome. In addition, environmental factors probably influence the risk of inhibitor development. The current... (More)
The formation of inhibitory alloantibodies is, in the postinfectious era, the most severe and costly complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia. The complexity of the immune response to the infused factor becomes more and more obvious as knowledge in the area increases. Antibodies develop as a result of a complex multi-factorial interaction between antigen-presenting cells, T- and B-lymphocytes. Genetic susceptibility of cell surface molecules, such as the major histocompatibility complex, the T-cell receptor and cytokine receptors, as well as various immunomodulatory molecules have a major impact on the outcome. In addition, environmental factors probably influence the risk of inhibitor development. The current concept of inhibitor development is reviewed. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved will facilitate improvement of therapy in the future, and hopefully provide an opportunity to prevent this complication of treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
inhibitors, risk factors, genotype, haemophilia
in
Haemophilia
volume
12 Suppl 3
pages
52 - 60
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000237117700008
  • scopus:33646140127
ISSN
1351-8216
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5b07d233-ad00-4c70-899b-9b32d69f3859 (old id 156907)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16683997&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 13:23:11
date last changed
2019-05-14 02:00:02
@article{5b07d233-ad00-4c70-899b-9b32d69f3859,
  abstract     = {The formation of inhibitory alloantibodies is, in the postinfectious era, the most severe and costly complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia. The complexity of the immune response to the infused factor becomes more and more obvious as knowledge in the area increases. Antibodies develop as a result of a complex multi-factorial interaction between antigen-presenting cells, T- and B-lymphocytes. Genetic susceptibility of cell surface molecules, such as the major histocompatibility complex, the T-cell receptor and cytokine receptors, as well as various immunomodulatory molecules have a major impact on the outcome. In addition, environmental factors probably influence the risk of inhibitor development. The current concept of inhibitor development is reviewed. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved will facilitate improvement of therapy in the future, and hopefully provide an opportunity to prevent this complication of treatment.},
  author       = {Astermark, Jan},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  keyword      = {inhibitors,risk factors,genotype,haemophilia},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {52--60},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {Why do inhibitors develop? Principles of and factors influencing the risk for inhibitor development in haemophilia.},
  volume       = {12 Suppl 3},
  year         = {2006},
}