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Rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia : Shear and elongational flows

la Fuente, Edmundo Brito de; Turcanu, Mihaela; Ekberg, Olle LU and Gallegos, Críspulo (2017) In Dysphagia p.687-716
Abstract

The physiological process of swallowing is not only a simple transfer of liquids or food boluses from the oral cavity to stomach, but also a complex succession of voluntary and involuntary phases that involve complex deformations and require the entire functionality of the oropharyngeal apparatus. When this functionality is affected, people experience dysphagia, which is described as a combination of symptoms that impairs or reduces patient’s ability to swallow. On the other hand, food texture also plays an important role in swallowing. Each liquid viscosity or bolus consistency is processed differently in the mouth and it requires a specific amount of lubrication and effort in order to be easily and safely swallowed. The science of... (More)

The physiological process of swallowing is not only a simple transfer of liquids or food boluses from the oral cavity to stomach, but also a complex succession of voluntary and involuntary phases that involve complex deformations and require the entire functionality of the oropharyngeal apparatus. When this functionality is affected, people experience dysphagia, which is described as a combination of symptoms that impairs or reduces patient’s ability to swallow. On the other hand, food texture also plays an important role in swallowing. Each liquid viscosity or bolus consistency is processed differently in the mouth and it requires a specific amount of lubrication and effort in order to be easily and safely swallowed. The science of rheology deals specifically with the deformation and the flow of matter. Therefore, rheology helps to characterise food behaviour in complex deformations, such as those encountered during swallowing. The knowledge of the deformability and flow of the bolus is particularly important in understanding and managing dysphagia. In this chapter, a short introduction on dysphagia is given. Section “Rheology Fundamentals” is dedicated to the science of rheology and provides a short description of the material functions relevant to this field. Dysphagia-designed products are used as examples. Section “Rheology, Swallowing and Dysphagia: State-of-the-Art” focuses on the rheological aspects of bolus oral processing and transport. A practical example on how shear rheology helps to tailor new dysphagia products is also included. Aspects about the role of extensional rheology in the swallowing are introduced. This section is followed by the rheological characterisation of different nutritional products in the presence of saliva. The role of human saliva in the management of dysphagia is as well discussed. The chapter ends with some concluding remarks.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Dysphagia
pages
30 pages
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052404548
ISSN
0942-5373
2197-4187
DOI
10.1007/174_2017_119
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5ee18832-6906-4f56-8f85-2df70087c810
date added to LUP
2018-09-14 12:57:26
date last changed
2018-09-16 04:57:22
@inbook{5ee18832-6906-4f56-8f85-2df70087c810,
  abstract     = {<p>The physiological process of swallowing is not only a simple transfer of liquids or food boluses from the oral cavity to stomach, but also a complex succession of voluntary and involuntary phases that involve complex deformations and require the entire functionality of the oropharyngeal apparatus. When this functionality is affected, people experience dysphagia, which is described as a combination of symptoms that impairs or reduces patient’s ability to swallow. On the other hand, food texture also plays an important role in swallowing. Each liquid viscosity or bolus consistency is processed differently in the mouth and it requires a specific amount of lubrication and effort in order to be easily and safely swallowed. The science of rheology deals specifically with the deformation and the flow of matter. Therefore, rheology helps to characterise food behaviour in complex deformations, such as those encountered during swallowing. The knowledge of the deformability and flow of the bolus is particularly important in understanding and managing dysphagia. In this chapter, a short introduction on dysphagia is given. Section “Rheology Fundamentals” is dedicated to the science of rheology and provides a short description of the material functions relevant to this field. Dysphagia-designed products are used as examples. Section “Rheology, Swallowing and Dysphagia: State-of-the-Art” focuses on the rheological aspects of bolus oral processing and transport. A practical example on how shear rheology helps to tailor new dysphagia products is also included. Aspects about the role of extensional rheology in the swallowing are introduced. This section is followed by the rheological characterisation of different nutritional products in the presence of saliva. The role of human saliva in the management of dysphagia is as well discussed. The chapter ends with some concluding remarks.</p>},
  author       = {la Fuente, Edmundo Brito de and Turcanu, Mihaela and Ekberg, Olle and Gallegos, Críspulo},
  issn         = {0942-5373},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {687--716},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {Dysphagia},
  title        = {Rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia : Shear and elongational flows},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/174_2017_119},
  year         = {2017},
}