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A life course perspective on economic stress and tobacco smoking: a population based study.

Lindström, Martin LU ; Modén, Birgit LU and Rosvall, Maria LU (2013) In Addiction 108(7). p.1305-1314
Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking, with reference to the accumulation, critical period and social mobility hypotheses from life-course epidemiology. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne, Sweden is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study based on a random sample which yielded 28,198 participants aged 18-80 (55% participation). Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking. FINDINGS: A 17.4% prevalence of men and 19.1% of women reported tobacco smoking. Tobacco smoking was more prevalent among middle-aged men and young women,... (More)
AIMS: To investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking, with reference to the accumulation, critical period and social mobility hypotheses from life-course epidemiology. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne, Sweden is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study based on a random sample which yielded 28,198 participants aged 18-80 (55% participation). Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking. FINDINGS: A 17.4% prevalence of men and 19.1% of women reported tobacco smoking. Tobacco smoking was more prevalent among middle-aged men and young women, among those born outside Sweden, with low occupational status, low social support, low trust, economic stress in childhood and adulthood. The accumulation hypothesis was confirmed because combined childhood and adulthood exposures to economic stress were associated (p<0.001) with tobacco smoking in a graded manner. The critical period hypothesis was not supported because the associations between economic stress in childhood as well as adulthood, respectively, and tobacco smoking were significant (p=0.004 and p<0.001) throughout the analyses. The social mobility hypothesis was confirmed because upward social mobility was significantly associated (p<0.001) with lower odds of smoking, while downward social mobility was significantly associated (p<0.001) with higher odds of smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Downward social mobility and economic stress in both childhood and adulthood should be considered as risk factors for tobacco smoking over the life course. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Addiction
volume
108
issue
7
pages
1305 - 1314
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000320120400022
  • pmid:23432606
  • scopus:84878946281
  • pmid:23432606
ISSN
1360-0443
DOI
10.1111/add.12143
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5f25339a-12a3-4324-ae94-5e5f39a40ef0 (old id 3559507)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23432606?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:32:58
date last changed
2020-09-09 01:29:07
@article{5f25339a-12a3-4324-ae94-5e5f39a40ef0,
  abstract     = {AIMS: To investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking, with reference to the accumulation, critical period and social mobility hypotheses from life-course epidemiology. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/MEASUREMENTS: The 2008 public health survey in Skåne, Sweden is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study based on a random sample which yielded 28,198 participants aged 18-80 (55% participation). Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and tobacco smoking. FINDINGS: A 17.4% prevalence of men and 19.1% of women reported tobacco smoking. Tobacco smoking was more prevalent among middle-aged men and young women, among those born outside Sweden, with low occupational status, low social support, low trust, economic stress in childhood and adulthood. The accumulation hypothesis was confirmed because combined childhood and adulthood exposures to economic stress were associated (p&lt;0.001) with tobacco smoking in a graded manner. The critical period hypothesis was not supported because the associations between economic stress in childhood as well as adulthood, respectively, and tobacco smoking were significant (p=0.004 and p&lt;0.001) throughout the analyses. The social mobility hypothesis was confirmed because upward social mobility was significantly associated (p&lt;0.001) with lower odds of smoking, while downward social mobility was significantly associated (p&lt;0.001) with higher odds of smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Downward social mobility and economic stress in both childhood and adulthood should be considered as risk factors for tobacco smoking over the life course.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Modén, Birgit and Rosvall, Maria},
  issn         = {1360-0443},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1305--1314},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Addiction},
  title        = {A life course perspective on economic stress and tobacco smoking: a population based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.12143},
  doi          = {10.1111/add.12143},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2013},
}