Advanced

The Effect of Birth Spacing on Child Mortality in Sweden, 1878-1926

Molitoris, Joseph LU (2017) In Population and Development Review 43(1). p.61-82
Abstract
A negative association between interval length and infant and child mortality has been consistently identified in modern developing countries. The reasons for this association are unclear, however. Leading hypotheses explain these differences as a result of sibling competition, maternal depletion, infection transmission, or unobserved maternal factors, but none has received overwhelming support. Using data from Stockholm between 1878 and 1926, this study contributes to the body of research by identifying trends in the relationship over time, controlling for unobserved maternal heterogeneity, and exploiting sibling deaths to better understand the mechanisms at work. Results show the association disappeared over time as infectious disease... (More)
A negative association between interval length and infant and child mortality has been consistently identified in modern developing countries. The reasons for this association are unclear, however. Leading hypotheses explain these differences as a result of sibling competition, maternal depletion, infection transmission, or unobserved maternal factors, but none has received overwhelming support. Using data from Stockholm between 1878 and 1926, this study contributes to the body of research by identifying trends in the relationship over time, controlling for unobserved maternal heterogeneity, and exploiting sibling deaths to better understand the mechanisms at work. Results show the association disappeared over time as infectious disease mortality fell and that deaths of previous siblings during the postnatal period disproportionately tended to increase the risk of dying among index children born after short intervals. These findings strongly suggest the relationship is related to the transmission of disease between closely spaced siblings. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
child mortality, birth spacing, Stockholm
in
Population and Development Review
volume
43
issue
1
pages
61 - 82
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85016204475
ISSN
0098-7921
DOI
10.1111/padr.12050
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5fa2949d-ac55-46c5-8a72-b91b145a8329
date added to LUP
2017-02-23 12:07:10
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:52:25
@article{5fa2949d-ac55-46c5-8a72-b91b145a8329,
  abstract     = {A negative association between interval length and infant and child mortality has been consistently identified in modern developing countries. The reasons for this association are unclear, however. Leading hypotheses explain these differences as a result of sibling competition, maternal depletion, infection transmission, or unobserved maternal factors, but none has received overwhelming support.  Using data from Stockholm between 1878 and 1926, this study contributes to the body of research by identifying trends in the relationship over time, controlling for unobserved maternal heterogeneity, and exploiting sibling deaths to better understand the mechanisms at work.  Results show the association disappeared over time as infectious disease mortality fell and that deaths of previous siblings during the postnatal period disproportionately tended to increase the risk of dying among index children born after short intervals. These findings strongly suggest the relationship is related to the transmission of disease between closely spaced siblings.},
  author       = {Molitoris, Joseph},
  issn         = {0098-7921},
  keyword      = {child mortality,birth spacing,Stockholm},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {61--82},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Population and Development Review},
  title        = {The Effect of Birth Spacing on Child Mortality in Sweden, 1878-1926},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/padr.12050},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2017},
}