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The inadequacy of ADHD: a philosophical contribution

Nilsson Sjöberg, Mattias LU and Dahlbeck, Johan (2017) In Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
Abstract (Swedish)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a widely spread diagnosis.
The dominant paradigm of ADHD is biomedical where ADHD is
defined as a brain disorder. At the same time, the legitimacy of the
diagnosis is being questioned since it is unclear whether or not ADHD
can be deemed a medical disorder in itself. The aim of this article is to
critically assess the merits of understanding the diagnosis of ADHD as a
medical condition defined as a brain disorder. This is being done using
the seventeenth century philosopher Benedict Spinoza’s (1632–1677)
notions of adequate and inadequate knowledge and his counterintuitive
theory of mental health. Doing so it becomes clear that ADHD, however
adequate... (More)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a widely spread diagnosis.
The dominant paradigm of ADHD is biomedical where ADHD is
defined as a brain disorder. At the same time, the legitimacy of the
diagnosis is being questioned since it is unclear whether or not ADHD
can be deemed a medical disorder in itself. The aim of this article is to
critically assess the merits of understanding the diagnosis of ADHD as a
medical condition defined as a brain disorder. This is being done using
the seventeenth century philosopher Benedict Spinoza’s (1632–1677)
notions of adequate and inadequate knowledge and his counterintuitive
theory of mental health. Doing so it becomes clear that ADHD, however
adequate it may seem, is founded on inadequate knowledge and that
the legitimacy of the individual diagnosis should therefore be questioned
on the grounds that on a long term scale it is passivizing and
stigmatizing rather that liberating. (Less)
Abstract
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a widely spread diagnosis.
The dominant paradigm of ADHD is biomedical where ADHD is
defined as a brain disorder. At the same time, the legitimacy of the
diagnosis is being questioned since it is unclear whether or not ADHD
can be deemed a medical disorder in itself. The aim of this article is to
critically assess the merits of understanding the diagnosis of ADHD as a
medical condition defined as a brain disorder. This is being done using
the seventeenth century philosopher Benedict Spinoza’s (1632–1677)
notions of adequate and inadequate knowledge and his counterintuitive
theory of mental health. Doing so it becomes clear that ADHD, however
adequate... (More)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a widely spread diagnosis.
The dominant paradigm of ADHD is biomedical where ADHD is
defined as a brain disorder. At the same time, the legitimacy of the
diagnosis is being questioned since it is unclear whether or not ADHD
can be deemed a medical disorder in itself. The aim of this article is to
critically assess the merits of understanding the diagnosis of ADHD as a
medical condition defined as a brain disorder. This is being done using
the seventeenth century philosopher Benedict Spinoza’s (1632–1677)
notions of adequate and inadequate knowledge and his counterintuitive
theory of mental health. Doing so it becomes clear that ADHD, however
adequate it may seem, is founded on inadequate knowledge and that
the legitimacy of the individual diagnosis should therefore be questioned
on the grounds that on a long term scale it is passivizing and
stigmatizing rather that liberating. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ADHD, education, ethics, knowledge, Spinoza, ADHD, education, ethics, knowledge, Spinoza
in
Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026880835
DOI
10.1080/13632752.2017.1361709
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
601eba1f-c5b6-4cdb-a023-acd87a0f8370
date added to LUP
2017-08-06 15:23:15
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:14:06
@article{601eba1f-c5b6-4cdb-a023-acd87a0f8370,
  abstract     = {Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a widely spread diagnosis.<br/>The dominant paradigm of ADHD is biomedical where ADHD is<br/>defined as a brain disorder. At the same time, the legitimacy of the<br/>diagnosis is being questioned since it is unclear whether or not ADHD<br/>can be deemed a medical disorder in itself. The aim of this article is to<br/>critically assess the merits of understanding the diagnosis of ADHD as a<br/>medical condition defined as a brain disorder. This is being done using<br/>the seventeenth century philosopher Benedict Spinoza’s (1632–1677)<br/>notions of adequate and inadequate knowledge and his counterintuitive<br/>theory of mental health. Doing so it becomes clear that ADHD, however<br/>adequate it may seem, is founded on inadequate knowledge and that<br/>the legitimacy of the individual diagnosis should therefore be questioned<br/>on the grounds that on a long term scale it is passivizing and<br/>stigmatizing rather that liberating.},
  author       = {Nilsson Sjöberg, Mattias and Dahlbeck, Johan},
  keyword      = {ADHD, education, ethics, knowledge, Spinoza,ADHD,education,ethics,knowledge,Spinoza},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties},
  title        = {The inadequacy of ADHD: a philosophical contribution},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13632752.2017.1361709},
  year         = {2017},
}