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Reducing CO2 Emissions by Substituting Biomass for Fossil Fuel

Gustavsson, Leif LU ; Börjesson, Pål LU ; Johansson, Bengt LU and Svenningsson, Per LU (1995) In Energy 20(11). p.1097-1113
Abstract
Replacing fossil fuels with sustainably-produced biomass will reduce the net flow of CO2 to the atmosphere. We express the efficiency of this substitution in reduced emissions per unit of used land or biomass and in costs of the substitution per tonne of C. The substitution costs are calculated as the cost difference between continued use of fossil fuels at current prices and the use of biomass, assuming that the biomass technologies are implemented when reinvestments in existing technologies are required. Energy inputs into biomass production and conversion are biomass-based, resulting in a CO2-neutral fuel cycle, while CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are estimated for the complete fuel cycles. Substituting biomass for fossil fuels in... (More)
Replacing fossil fuels with sustainably-produced biomass will reduce the net flow of CO2 to the atmosphere. We express the efficiency of this substitution in reduced emissions per unit of used land or biomass and in costs of the substitution per tonne of C. The substitution costs are calculated as the cost difference between continued use of fossil fuels at current prices and the use of biomass, assuming that the biomass technologies are implemented when reinvestments in existing technologies are required. Energy inputs into biomass production and conversion are biomass-based, resulting in a CO2-neutral fuel cycle, while CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are estimated for the complete fuel cycles. Substituting biomass for fossil fuels in electricity and heat production is, in general, less costly and provides larger CO2 reduction per unit of biomass than substituting biomass for gasoline or diesel used in vehicles. For transportation, methanol or ethanol produced from short-rotation forests or logging residues provide larger CO2-emission reductions than rape methyl ester from rape seed, biogas from lucerne (alfalfa), or ethanol from wheat. Of these, methanol has the lowest emission-reduction costs. Increasing biomass used by 125 TWh/yr, the estimated potential for increased utilization of logging residues, straw and energy crops, would eliminate more than one-half of the Swedish CO2 emissions from fossil fuels of 15 Mtonnes C in 1992. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Energy
volume
20
issue
11
pages
1097 - 1113
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0028872993
ISSN
1873-6785
DOI
10.1016/0360-5442(95)00065-O
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a147a56f-cece-49c4-bdd3-da63a09a8d2c (old id 604219)
date added to LUP
2009-04-01 11:16:18
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:31:04
@article{a147a56f-cece-49c4-bdd3-da63a09a8d2c,
  abstract     = {Replacing fossil fuels with sustainably-produced biomass will reduce the net flow of CO2 to the atmosphere. We express the efficiency of this substitution in reduced emissions per unit of used land or biomass and in costs of the substitution per tonne of C. The substitution costs are calculated as the cost difference between continued use of fossil fuels at current prices and the use of biomass, assuming that the biomass technologies are implemented when reinvestments in existing technologies are required. Energy inputs into biomass production and conversion are biomass-based, resulting in a CO2-neutral fuel cycle, while CO2 emissions from fossil fuels are estimated for the complete fuel cycles. Substituting biomass for fossil fuels in electricity and heat production is, in general, less costly and provides larger CO2 reduction per unit of biomass than substituting biomass for gasoline or diesel used in vehicles. For transportation, methanol or ethanol produced from short-rotation forests or logging residues provide larger CO2-emission reductions than rape methyl ester from rape seed, biogas from lucerne (alfalfa), or ethanol from wheat. Of these, methanol has the lowest emission-reduction costs. Increasing biomass used by 125 TWh/yr, the estimated potential for increased utilization of logging residues, straw and energy crops, would eliminate more than one-half of the Swedish CO2 emissions from fossil fuels of 15 Mtonnes C in 1992.},
  author       = {Gustavsson, Leif and Börjesson, Pål and Johansson, Bengt and Svenningsson, Per},
  issn         = {1873-6785},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1097--1113},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Energy},
  title        = {Reducing CO2 Emissions by Substituting Biomass for Fossil Fuel},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0360-5442(95)00065-O},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {1995},
}