Advanced

Effect of bioactive polypeptides on leaking large bowel anastomosis and intestines in the rat.

Tingstedt, Bobby LU ; Nehéz, Laszlo LU ; Lindman, Björn LU and Andersson, Roland LU (2007) In Journal of Investigative Surgery 20(4). p.229-235
Abstract
Anastomotic leakage and postoperative adhesions represent major complications after colorectal surgery. We have previously shown a positive effect on both anastomotic strength and abdominal adhesions by the use of differently charged bioactive polypeptides. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the same polypeptides on the healing of an insufficient intestinal anastomosis, as well as on accidental intestinal injury, in addition to measuring the preventive effect against the development of abdominal adhesions. An insufficient, and thereby potentially leaking, intestinal anastomosis and punctures of the intestine ("accidental intestinal injury model") were performed in rats. The treatment groups received intraperitoneal... (More)
Anastomotic leakage and postoperative adhesions represent major complications after colorectal surgery. We have previously shown a positive effect on both anastomotic strength and abdominal adhesions by the use of differently charged bioactive polypeptides. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the same polypeptides on the healing of an insufficient intestinal anastomosis, as well as on accidental intestinal injury, in addition to measuring the preventive effect against the development of abdominal adhesions. An insufficient, and thereby potentially leaking, intestinal anastomosis and punctures of the intestine ("accidental intestinal injury model") were performed in rats. The treatment groups received intraperitoneal administration of poly-L-lysine and poly-L-glutamate, while controls received sodium chloride. Burst pressure, extent of abdominal adhesions, and postoperative complications were analyzed in both experimental models. A significant decrease of adhesions was seen in all animals treated with polypeptides (p < .05). Burst pressure was significantly higher (p < .001) in animals with intestinal perforation as seen on day 1 and then decreasing. A significant decrease in the incidence of peritonitis was also noted early (day 1) in this model (p = .002). The mortality and complications were high in the intestinal anastomosis model, though not affected by treatment with polypeptides. Intraabdominal adhesions were significantly reduced using polypeptides in this study, with no observed effect on other postsurgical complications. There were signs of less infectious complications in polypeptide treated animals. In animals with accidental intestinal injury, a higher burst pressure was noted in treated animals. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Investigative Surgery
volume
20
issue
4
pages
229 - 235
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000248809700004
  • scopus:34548233887
ISSN
0894-1939
DOI
10.1080/08941930701481288
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c735c1e0-8b30-4391-85d2-cc944559d661 (old id 606765)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17710603&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-11-23 11:16:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:29:02
@article{c735c1e0-8b30-4391-85d2-cc944559d661,
  abstract     = {Anastomotic leakage and postoperative adhesions represent major complications after colorectal surgery. We have previously shown a positive effect on both anastomotic strength and abdominal adhesions by the use of differently charged bioactive polypeptides. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the same polypeptides on the healing of an insufficient intestinal anastomosis, as well as on accidental intestinal injury, in addition to measuring the preventive effect against the development of abdominal adhesions. An insufficient, and thereby potentially leaking, intestinal anastomosis and punctures of the intestine ("accidental intestinal injury model") were performed in rats. The treatment groups received intraperitoneal administration of poly-L-lysine and poly-L-glutamate, while controls received sodium chloride. Burst pressure, extent of abdominal adhesions, and postoperative complications were analyzed in both experimental models. A significant decrease of adhesions was seen in all animals treated with polypeptides (p &lt; .05). Burst pressure was significantly higher (p &lt; .001) in animals with intestinal perforation as seen on day 1 and then decreasing. A significant decrease in the incidence of peritonitis was also noted early (day 1) in this model (p = .002). The mortality and complications were high in the intestinal anastomosis model, though not affected by treatment with polypeptides. Intraabdominal adhesions were significantly reduced using polypeptides in this study, with no observed effect on other postsurgical complications. There were signs of less infectious complications in polypeptide treated animals. In animals with accidental intestinal injury, a higher burst pressure was noted in treated animals.},
  author       = {Tingstedt, Bobby and Nehéz, Laszlo and Lindman, Björn and Andersson, Roland},
  issn         = {0894-1939},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {229--235},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Investigative Surgery},
  title        = {Effect of bioactive polypeptides on leaking large bowel anastomosis and intestines in the rat.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08941930701481288},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2007},
}