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Stability in women's experiences of hassles and uplifts: a five-year follow-up survey

Erlandsson, Lena-Karin LU (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 15(2). p.95-104
Abstract
Hassles and uplifts, a concept used in measuring daily stress events, was applied to working mothers' everyday life. The aim was to explore the stability in working mothers' experiences in patterns of daily occupations, operationalized as hassles and uplifts, between the year 2000 (baseline) and the year 2005 (follow-up). Further, the intention was to reveal possible differences in the number, origins, and ratings of hassles or uplifts between baseline and follow-up. The baseline study comprised 100 women, of whom 77 agreed to participate in the follow-up study. At baseline the questionnaire THU-5 was applied in the form of an interview, and at follow-up it was adapted to a self-response questionnaire sent home to the respondents.... (More)
Hassles and uplifts, a concept used in measuring daily stress events, was applied to working mothers' everyday life. The aim was to explore the stability in working mothers' experiences in patterns of daily occupations, operationalized as hassles and uplifts, between the year 2000 (baseline) and the year 2005 (follow-up). Further, the intention was to reveal possible differences in the number, origins, and ratings of hassles or uplifts between baseline and follow-up. The baseline study comprised 100 women, of whom 77 agreed to participate in the follow-up study. At baseline the questionnaire THU-5 was applied in the form of an interview, and at follow-up it was adapted to a self-response questionnaire sent home to the respondents. Stability was explored qualitatively by investigating the reported causes of hassles and uplifts, and quantitatively by comparing the numbers and ratings of the experiences at baseline and at follow-up. The results indicate a certain amount of stability, although the cause of the experiences changes in line with changes in life stage. It was concluded that the methodology used (THU-5 and THU-3) was sensitive to these changes and could be applied in clinical settings, providing occupational therapists with a tool for detecting daily hassles that could be dealt with. Likewise, detected uplifts can be useful in the process of re-clesigning patterns of daily occupations affected by stress. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
uplifts, women's health, hassles, daily occupations, content analysis
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
volume
15
issue
2
pages
95 - 104
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000258363100005
  • scopus:46949089271
ISSN
1651-2014
DOI
10.1080/11038120701560467
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9f2d9a1a-c931-4fc6-a758-3b6fcf4f5c7e (old id 607778)
date added to LUP
2009-07-27 12:22:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:14:47
@article{9f2d9a1a-c931-4fc6-a758-3b6fcf4f5c7e,
  abstract     = {Hassles and uplifts, a concept used in measuring daily stress events, was applied to working mothers' everyday life. The aim was to explore the stability in working mothers' experiences in patterns of daily occupations, operationalized as hassles and uplifts, between the year 2000 (baseline) and the year 2005 (follow-up). Further, the intention was to reveal possible differences in the number, origins, and ratings of hassles or uplifts between baseline and follow-up. The baseline study comprised 100 women, of whom 77 agreed to participate in the follow-up study. At baseline the questionnaire THU-5 was applied in the form of an interview, and at follow-up it was adapted to a self-response questionnaire sent home to the respondents. Stability was explored qualitatively by investigating the reported causes of hassles and uplifts, and quantitatively by comparing the numbers and ratings of the experiences at baseline and at follow-up. The results indicate a certain amount of stability, although the cause of the experiences changes in line with changes in life stage. It was concluded that the methodology used (THU-5 and THU-3) was sensitive to these changes and could be applied in clinical settings, providing occupational therapists with a tool for detecting daily hassles that could be dealt with. Likewise, detected uplifts can be useful in the process of re-clesigning patterns of daily occupations affected by stress.},
  author       = {Erlandsson, Lena-Karin},
  issn         = {1651-2014},
  keyword      = {uplifts,women's health,hassles,daily occupations,content analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {95--104},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Stability in women's experiences of hassles and uplifts: a five-year follow-up survey},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038120701560467},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2008},
}