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Cardiovascular responses to cold water immersions of forearm and face and their relationship to apnoea

Andersson, Johan LU ; Schagatay, Erica; Gislén, Anna LU and Holm, Boris LU (2000) In European Journal of Applied Physiology 83. p.566-572
Abstract
Apnoea as well as cold stimulation of the face or the extremities elicits marked cardiovascular reflexes in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether forearm immersion in cold water has any effect on the cardiovascular responses to face immersion and apnoea. We recorded cardiovascular responses to coldwater immersions of the forearm and face in 19 (part I) and 23 subjects (part II). The experimental protocol was divided in two parts, each part containing four tests: Il, forearm immersion during eupnoea; I-2, face immersion during eupnoea; I-3, forearm and face immersion during eupnoea; I-4, face immersion during apnoea; II1, apnoea without immersion; II2, forearm immersion during apnoea; II3, face immersion during... (More)
Apnoea as well as cold stimulation of the face or the extremities elicits marked cardiovascular reflexes in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether forearm immersion in cold water has any effect on the cardiovascular responses to face immersion and apnoea. We recorded cardiovascular responses to coldwater immersions of the forearm and face in 19 (part I) and 23 subjects (part II). The experimental protocol was divided in two parts, each part containing four tests: Il, forearm immersion during eupnoea; I-2, face immersion during eupnoea; I-3, forearm and face immersion during eupnoea; I-4, face immersion during apnoea; II1, apnoea without immersion; II2, forearm immersion during apnoea; II3, face immersion during apnoea; and II4, forearm and face immersion during apnoea. The water temperature was 9-11 degreesC. Cold-water immersion of either the forearm or face was enough to elicit the most pronounced thermoregulatory vasoconstriction during both eupnoea and apnoea. During eupnoea, heart rate responses to forearm immersion (3% increase) and face immersion (9% decrease) were additive during concurrent stimulation (3% decrease): During apnoea, the heart rate responses were not affected by the forearm immersion. The oxygen-conserving diving response seems to dominate over thermoregulatory responses in the threat of asphyxia. During breathing, however, the diving response serves no purpose and does not set thermoregulatory adjustments aside. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
diving response, tachycardia, arterial blood pressure, human diving response, cold stimulation, bradycardia
in
European Journal of Applied Physiology
volume
83
pages
566 - 572
publisher
Springer
ISSN
1439-6327
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ff7cea0-4de7-4ff9-a4ab-20cae384fcb0 (old id 617570)
date added to LUP
2007-11-27 13:11:13
date last changed
2016-04-16 05:40:18
@article{6ff7cea0-4de7-4ff9-a4ab-20cae384fcb0,
  abstract     = {Apnoea as well as cold stimulation of the face or the extremities elicits marked cardiovascular reflexes in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether forearm immersion in cold water has any effect on the cardiovascular responses to face immersion and apnoea. We recorded cardiovascular responses to coldwater immersions of the forearm and face in 19 (part I) and 23 subjects (part II). The experimental protocol was divided in two parts, each part containing four tests: Il, forearm immersion during eupnoea; I-2, face immersion during eupnoea; I-3, forearm and face immersion during eupnoea; I-4, face immersion during apnoea; II1, apnoea without immersion; II2, forearm immersion during apnoea; II3, face immersion during apnoea; and II4, forearm and face immersion during apnoea. The water temperature was 9-11 degreesC. Cold-water immersion of either the forearm or face was enough to elicit the most pronounced thermoregulatory vasoconstriction during both eupnoea and apnoea. During eupnoea, heart rate responses to forearm immersion (3% increase) and face immersion (9% decrease) were additive during concurrent stimulation (3% decrease): During apnoea, the heart rate responses were not affected by the forearm immersion. The oxygen-conserving diving response seems to dominate over thermoregulatory responses in the threat of asphyxia. During breathing, however, the diving response serves no purpose and does not set thermoregulatory adjustments aside.},
  author       = {Andersson, Johan and Schagatay, Erica and Gislén, Anna and Holm, Boris},
  issn         = {1439-6327},
  keyword      = {diving response,tachycardia,arterial blood pressure,human diving response,cold stimulation,bradycardia},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {566--572},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  title        = {Cardiovascular responses to cold water immersions of forearm and face and their relationship to apnoea},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2000},
}