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Land, water and the symbolic aspects of the Mesolithic in southern Scandinavia

Larsson, Lars LU (2003) In Before Farming 2003(4).
Abstract
This paper presents a preliminary model of the occupational history of the valley bottoms at the edges of the bed of the Quequén Grande River (Argentina) during the late Holocene. The ultimate goal of the research is to situate some aspects of technology, mobility, land-use patterns and settlement systems as a proximal consequence of a long-term process of 'lithification', that is, the positioning of lithic raw material across otherwise lithic-free areas of the landscape.



In order to address this issue, distributions of lithic artefacts are used to discuss features of the regional technological organisation and settlement systems and the relationships between people and the landscape. In that sense, lithification, a... (More)
This paper presents a preliminary model of the occupational history of the valley bottoms at the edges of the bed of the Quequén Grande River (Argentina) during the late Holocene. The ultimate goal of the research is to situate some aspects of technology, mobility, land-use patterns and settlement systems as a proximal consequence of a long-term process of 'lithification', that is, the positioning of lithic raw material across otherwise lithic-free areas of the landscape.



In order to address this issue, distributions of lithic artefacts are used to discuss features of the regional technological organisation and settlement systems and the relationships between people and the landscape. In that sense, lithification, a variant of a 'provisioning places' strategy, has implications for other aspects of a human adaptive system. The lithification process has influenced the organisation of technology, in particular the degree of planning and anticipation necessary, which in turn affects the degree to which technological strategies (eg, curation and expediency) were employed. Lithification also has implications for the organisation of logistical and residential mobility strategies by encouraging reoccupations, changing periodicity of reoccupation, altering landscape use patterns, and making for longer seasonal or task-specific stays. One end result is an artificial conflation of resources, and a lessening of resource heterogeneity. For example, there will be more places where critical resources, such as water, fauna, and flora, co-occur with the lithic resources needed to exploit them. The lithic raw material distribution is only partially dependant on natural occurrence because the environment has been reorganised and (intentionally or otherwise) built by human activity. We propose that in the Pampas the late Holocene witnesses a process of 'building a landscape' which had implications for social organisation and hence played an important role in regional human adaptation and cultural evolution. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
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published
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in
Before Farming
volume
2003
issue
4
publisher
WASP
ISSN
1476-4253
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e305c5a5-22f7-4919-87ac-d919e5628c0a (old id 627448)
alternative location
http://www.waspress.co.uk/journals/beforefarming/
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 09:46:51
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:45:46
@article{e305c5a5-22f7-4919-87ac-d919e5628c0a,
  abstract     = {This paper presents a preliminary model of the occupational history of the valley bottoms at the edges of the bed of the Quequén Grande River (Argentina) during the late Holocene. The ultimate goal of the research is to situate some aspects of technology, mobility, land-use patterns and settlement systems as a proximal consequence of a long-term process of 'lithification', that is, the positioning of lithic raw material across otherwise lithic-free areas of the landscape. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
In order to address this issue, distributions of lithic artefacts are used to discuss features of the regional technological organisation and settlement systems and the relationships between people and the landscape. In that sense, lithification, a variant of a 'provisioning places' strategy, has implications for other aspects of a human adaptive system. The lithification process has influenced the organisation of technology, in particular the degree of planning and anticipation necessary, which in turn affects the degree to which technological strategies (eg, curation and expediency) were employed. Lithification also has implications for the organisation of logistical and residential mobility strategies by encouraging reoccupations, changing periodicity of reoccupation, altering landscape use patterns, and making for longer seasonal or task-specific stays. One end result is an artificial conflation of resources, and a lessening of resource heterogeneity. For example, there will be more places where critical resources, such as water, fauna, and flora, co-occur with the lithic resources needed to exploit them. The lithic raw material distribution is only partially dependant on natural occurrence because the environment has been reorganised and (intentionally or otherwise) built by human activity. We propose that in the Pampas the late Holocene witnesses a process of 'building a landscape' which had implications for social organisation and hence played an important role in regional human adaptation and cultural evolution.},
  author       = {Larsson, Lars},
  issn         = {1476-4253},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {WASP},
  series       = {Before Farming},
  title        = {Land, water and the symbolic aspects of the Mesolithic in southern Scandinavia},
  volume       = {2003},
  year         = {2003},
}