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Is the wall of a cellulose fiber saturated with liquid whether or not permeable with CO2 dissolved molecules? Application to bubble nucleation in champagne wines

Liger-Belair, G; Topgaard, Daniel LU ; Voisin, C and Jeandet, P (2004) In Langmuir 20(10). p.4132-4138
Abstract
In this paper, the transversal diffusion coefficient D of CO2 dissolved molecules through the wall of a hydrated cellulose fiber was approached, from the liquid bulk diffusion coefficient of CO2 dissolved molecules modified by an obstruction factor. The porous network between the cellulose microfibrils of the fiber wall was assumed being saturated with liquid. We retrieved information from previous NMR experiments on the self-diffusion of water in cellulose fibers to reach an order of magnitude for the transversal diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules through the fiber wall. A value of about D 0.2D0 was proposed, D0 being the diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules in the liquid bulk. Because most of bubble nucleation sites in a glass... (More)
In this paper, the transversal diffusion coefficient D of CO2 dissolved molecules through the wall of a hydrated cellulose fiber was approached, from the liquid bulk diffusion coefficient of CO2 dissolved molecules modified by an obstruction factor. The porous network between the cellulose microfibrils of the fiber wall was assumed being saturated with liquid. We retrieved information from previous NMR experiments on the self-diffusion of water in cellulose fibers to reach an order of magnitude for the transversal diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules through the fiber wall. A value of about D 0.2D0 was proposed, D0 being the diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules in the liquid bulk. Because most of bubble nucleation sites in a glass poured with carbonated beverage are cellulose fibers cast off from paper or cloth which floated from the surrounding air, or remaining from the wiping process, this result directly applies to the kinetics of carbon dioxide bubble formation from champagne and sparkling wines. If the cellulose fiber wall was impermeable with regard to CO2 dissolved molecules, it was suggested that the kinetics of bubbling would be about three times less than it is. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Langmuir
volume
20
issue
10
pages
4132 - 4138
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:2542430071
ISSN
0743-7463
DOI
10.1021/la049960f
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39fb2435-5bbb-4989-8d03-144dfaa72291 (old id 631385)
date added to LUP
2008-01-07 09:43:21
date last changed
2017-02-05 03:41:39
@article{39fb2435-5bbb-4989-8d03-144dfaa72291,
  abstract     = {In this paper, the transversal diffusion coefficient D of CO2 dissolved molecules through the wall of a hydrated cellulose fiber was approached, from the liquid bulk diffusion coefficient of CO2 dissolved molecules modified by an obstruction factor. The porous network between the cellulose microfibrils of the fiber wall was assumed being saturated with liquid. We retrieved information from previous NMR experiments on the self-diffusion of water in cellulose fibers to reach an order of magnitude for the transversal diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules through the fiber wall. A value of about D 0.2D0 was proposed, D0 being the diffusion coefficient of CO2 molecules in the liquid bulk. Because most of bubble nucleation sites in a glass poured with carbonated beverage are cellulose fibers cast off from paper or cloth which floated from the surrounding air, or remaining from the wiping process, this result directly applies to the kinetics of carbon dioxide bubble formation from champagne and sparkling wines. If the cellulose fiber wall was impermeable with regard to CO2 dissolved molecules, it was suggested that the kinetics of bubbling would be about three times less than it is.},
  author       = {Liger-Belair, G and Topgaard, Daniel and Voisin, C and Jeandet, P},
  issn         = {0743-7463},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {4132--4138},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Langmuir},
  title        = {Is the wall of a cellulose fiber saturated with liquid whether or not permeable with CO2 dissolved molecules? Application to bubble nucleation in champagne wines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la049960f},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2004},
}