Advanced

Footwear for cold work: a limited questionnaire survey

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Gavhed, Désirée; Karlsson, Eva; Holmér, Ingvar LU and Abeysekera, John (2000) Ergonomics of Protective Clothing: NOKOBETEF 6 and 1st European Conference on Protective Clothing In Arbete och hälsa p.67-70
Abstract
This questionnaire survey was initiated to acquire information for prepration of a series of field studies. The paper deals with questions that were related to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The questionnaire was sent to a harbour, a telecommunication company and a customs office. At the harbour most of the workers used footwear with warm lining during winter. Half of them used also footwear without lining occasionally or regularly. The telecommunication workers used warm boots and one of them used footwear without lining occasionally while at customs all the workers regularly wore footwear without lining. Most cold injuries were reported in toes. Half of the workers were dissatisfied with their clothing. The... (More)
This questionnaire survey was initiated to acquire information for prepration of a series of field studies. The paper deals with questions that were related to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The questionnaire was sent to a harbour, a telecommunication company and a customs office. At the harbour most of the workers used footwear with warm lining during winter. Half of them used also footwear without lining occasionally or regularly. The telecommunication workers used warm boots and one of them used footwear without lining occasionally while at customs all the workers regularly wore footwear without lining. Most cold injuries were reported in toes. Half of the workers were dissatisfied with their clothing. The footwear was considered to be the worst. 47 % of the workers (harbour 50 %, telecommunication 31 % and customs 75 %) had experienced problems with footwear in the cold climate. The most common problems connected with footwear were feeling cold in feet (30 of 43) followed by risk to slip (16) and wet (15) or sweaty (12) feet. Slipping was considered as the next biggest problem after cold: 30 workers had slipped and 22 had fallen during last two winter seasons. In five cases falls had ended with an injury: ligament injury, caudal vertebrae contusion, muscle strain and tooth injury, foot sprain and lumbago. According to the responders the problem with footwear was low insulation that resulted in cold feet. Better communication between workers and employers could be helpful for purchasing in footwear according to the workers’ needs. Simultaneously, it requires more knowledge and information on products and insulation requirements in various conditions. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Arbete och hälsa
editor
Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar; and
issue
2000:8
pages
4 pages
publisher
National Institute for Working Life
conference name
Ergonomics of Protective Clothing: NOKOBETEF 6 and 1st European Conference on Protective Clothing
ISSN
0346-7821
ISBN
91-7045-559-7
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f7ae9b80-e711-4649-b6b8-d64531f828d4 (old id 634799)
alternative location
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/4246
date added to LUP
2008-09-30 14:33:05
date last changed
2016-04-16 02:48:22
@inproceedings{f7ae9b80-e711-4649-b6b8-d64531f828d4,
  abstract     = {This questionnaire survey was initiated to acquire information for prepration of a series of field studies. The paper deals with questions that were related to the thermal responses of the feet and footwear performance. The questionnaire was sent to a harbour, a telecommunication company and a customs office. At the harbour most of the workers used footwear with warm lining during winter. Half of them used also footwear without lining occasionally or regularly. The telecommunication workers used warm boots and one of them used footwear without lining occasionally while at customs all the workers regularly wore footwear without lining. Most cold injuries were reported in toes. Half of the workers were dissatisfied with their clothing. The footwear was considered to be the worst. 47 % of the workers (harbour 50 %, telecommunication 31 % and customs 75 %) had experienced problems with footwear in the cold climate. The most common problems connected with footwear were feeling cold in feet (30 of 43) followed by risk to slip (16) and wet (15) or sweaty (12) feet. Slipping was considered as the next biggest problem after cold: 30 workers had slipped and 22 had fallen during last two winter seasons. In five cases falls had ended with an injury: ligament injury, caudal vertebrae contusion, muscle strain and tooth injury, foot sprain and lumbago. According to the responders the problem with footwear was low insulation that resulted in cold feet. Better communication between workers and employers could be helpful for purchasing in footwear according to the workers’ needs. Simultaneously, it requires more knowledge and information on products and insulation requirements in various conditions.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Gavhed, Désirée and Karlsson, Eva and Holmér, Ingvar and Abeysekera, John},
  booktitle    = {Arbete och hälsa},
  editor       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Holmér, Ingvar},
  isbn         = {91-7045-559-7},
  issn         = {0346-7821},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2000:8},
  pages        = {67--70},
  publisher    = {National Institute for Working Life},
  title        = {Footwear for cold work: a limited questionnaire survey},
  year         = {2000},
}