Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Industrial automation and intergenerational income mobility in the United States

Berger, Thor LU and Engzell, Per (2022) In Social Science Research 104.
Abstract

This article examines how the automation of jobs has shaped spatial patterns of intergenerational income mobility in the United States over the past three decades. Using data on the spread of industrial robots across 722 local labor markets, we find significantly lower rates of upward mobility in areas more exposed to automation. The erosion of mobility chances is rooted in childhood environments and is particularly evident among males growing up in low-income households. These findings reveal how recent technological advances have contributed to the unequal patterns of economic opportunity in the United States today.

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Deindustrialization, Income distribution, Intergenerational mobility, Regional inequality, Social mobility, Technological change
in
Social Science Research
volume
104
article number
102686
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85123063949
  • pmid:35400391
ISSN
0049-089X
DOI
10.1016/j.ssresearch.2021.102686
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
634bcd4a-c060-4141-8d38-be30764b5aca
date added to LUP
2022-03-25 14:51:09
date last changed
2024-06-13 11:41:52
@article{634bcd4a-c060-4141-8d38-be30764b5aca,
  abstract     = {{<p>This article examines how the automation of jobs has shaped spatial patterns of intergenerational income mobility in the United States over the past three decades. Using data on the spread of industrial robots across 722 local labor markets, we find significantly lower rates of upward mobility in areas more exposed to automation. The erosion of mobility chances is rooted in childhood environments and is particularly evident among males growing up in low-income households. These findings reveal how recent technological advances have contributed to the unequal patterns of economic opportunity in the United States today.</p>}},
  author       = {{Berger, Thor and Engzell, Per}},
  issn         = {{0049-089X}},
  keywords     = {{Deindustrialization; Income distribution; Intergenerational mobility; Regional inequality; Social mobility; Technological change}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  publisher    = {{Elsevier}},
  series       = {{Social Science Research}},
  title        = {{Industrial automation and intergenerational income mobility in the United States}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssresearch.2021.102686}},
  doi          = {{10.1016/j.ssresearch.2021.102686}},
  volume       = {{104}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}