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Impact structures and events - a Nordic perspective

Dypvik, H.; Dayioglu, S.; Heinberg, C.; Håkansson, E.; Pesonen, L.; Plado, J. and Schmitz, Birger LU (2008) In Episodes 31(1:SI). p.107-114
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Impact cratering is one of the fundamental processes in the formation of the Earth and our planetary system, as reflected, for example in the surfaces of Mars and the Moon. The Earth has been covered by a comparable number of impact scars, but due to active geological processes, weathering, sea floor spreading etc, the number of preserved and recognized impact craters on the Earth are limited. The study of impact structures is consequently of great importance in our understanding of the formation of the Earth and the planets, and one way we directly, on the Earth, can study planetary geology.



The Nordic-Baltic area have about thirty confirmed impact structures which makes it one... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Impact cratering is one of the fundamental processes in the formation of the Earth and our planetary system, as reflected, for example in the surfaces of Mars and the Moon. The Earth has been covered by a comparable number of impact scars, but due to active geological processes, weathering, sea floor spreading etc, the number of preserved and recognized impact craters on the Earth are limited. The study of impact structures is consequently of great importance in our understanding of the formation of the Earth and the planets, and one way we directly, on the Earth, can study planetary geology.



The Nordic-Baltic area have about thirty confirmed impact structures which makes it one of the most densely crater populated terrains on Earth. The high density of identified craters is due to the level of research activity, coupled with a deterministic view of what we look for. In spite of these results, many Nordic structures are poorly understood due to the lack of 3D-geophysical interpretations, isotopeor other dating efforts and better knowledge of the amount of erosion and subsequent tectonic modifications.



The Nordic and Baltic impact community is closely collaborating in several impact-related projects and the many researchers (about forty) and PhD students (some seventeen) promise that this level will continue for many more years. The main topics of research include geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies in combination with modeling and impact experiments. Moreover, the Nordic and Baltic crust contains some hundred suspect structures which call for detailed analysis to define their origin.



New advanced methods of analyzing geophysical information in combination with detailed geochemical analyses and numerical modeling will be the future basic occupation of the impact scientists of the region. The unique Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (K-T) occurrences in Denmark form an important source of information in explaining one of the major mass extinctions on Earth. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Episodes
volume
31
issue
1:SI
pages
107 - 114
publisher
International Union of Geological Sciences
external identifiers
  • wos:000255771300016
  • scopus:44649133348
ISSN
0705-3797
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b63e0d53-c4c3-49bb-a286-750b5dfee63d (old id 635383)
date added to LUP
2007-12-13 15:37:37
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:54:55
@article{b63e0d53-c4c3-49bb-a286-750b5dfee63d,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Impact cratering is one of the fundamental processes in the formation of the Earth and our planetary system, as reflected, for example in the surfaces of Mars and the Moon. The Earth has been covered by a comparable number of impact scars, but due to active geological processes, weathering, sea floor spreading etc, the number of preserved and recognized impact craters on the Earth are limited. The study of impact structures is consequently of great importance in our understanding of the formation of the Earth and the planets, and one way we directly, on the Earth, can study planetary geology. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
The Nordic-Baltic area have about thirty confirmed impact structures which makes it one of the most densely crater populated terrains on Earth. The high density of identified craters is due to the level of research activity, coupled with a deterministic view of what we look for. In spite of these results, many Nordic structures are poorly understood due to the lack of 3D-geophysical interpretations, isotopeor other dating efforts and better knowledge of the amount of erosion and subsequent tectonic modifications. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
The Nordic and Baltic impact community is closely collaborating in several impact-related projects and the many researchers (about forty) and PhD students (some seventeen) promise that this level will continue for many more years. The main topics of research include geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies in combination with modeling and impact experiments. Moreover, the Nordic and Baltic crust contains some hundred suspect structures which call for detailed analysis to define their origin. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
New advanced methods of analyzing geophysical information in combination with detailed geochemical analyses and numerical modeling will be the future basic occupation of the impact scientists of the region. The unique Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (K-T) occurrences in Denmark form an important source of information in explaining one of the major mass extinctions on Earth.},
  author       = {Dypvik, H. and Dayioglu, S. and Heinberg, C. and Håkansson, E. and Pesonen, L. and Plado, J. and Schmitz, Birger},
  issn         = {0705-3797},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1:SI},
  pages        = {107--114},
  publisher    = {International Union of Geological Sciences},
  series       = {Episodes},
  title        = {Impact structures and events - a Nordic perspective},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2008},
}