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Glioma imaging in Europe : A survey of 220 centres and recommendations for best clinical practice

Thust, S. C.; Heiland, S.; Falini, A.; Jäger, H. R.; Waldman, A. D.; Sundgren, P. C. LU ; Godi, C.; Katsaros, V. K.; Ramos, A. and Bargallo, N., et al. (2018) In European Radiology p.1-12
Abstract

Objectives: At a European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) Annual Meeting 2015 workshop, commonalities in practice, current controversies and technical hurdles in glioma MRI were discussed. We aimed to formulate guidance on MRI of glioma and determine its feasibility, by seeking information on glioma imaging practices from the European Neuroradiology community. Methods: Invitations to a structured survey were emailed to ESNR members (n=1,662) and associates (n=6,400), European national radiologists’ societies and distributed via social media. Results: Responses were received from 220 institutions (59% academic). Conventional imaging protocols generally include T2w, T2-FLAIR, DWI, and pre- and post-contrast T1w. Perfusion MRI is used... (More)

Objectives: At a European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) Annual Meeting 2015 workshop, commonalities in practice, current controversies and technical hurdles in glioma MRI were discussed. We aimed to formulate guidance on MRI of glioma and determine its feasibility, by seeking information on glioma imaging practices from the European Neuroradiology community. Methods: Invitations to a structured survey were emailed to ESNR members (n=1,662) and associates (n=6,400), European national radiologists’ societies and distributed via social media. Results: Responses were received from 220 institutions (59% academic). Conventional imaging protocols generally include T2w, T2-FLAIR, DWI, and pre- and post-contrast T1w. Perfusion MRI is used widely (85.5%), while spectroscopy seems reserved for specific indications. Reasons for omitting advanced imaging modalities include lack of facility/software, time constraints and no requests. Early postoperative MRI is routinely carried out by 74% within 24–72 h, but only 17% report a percent measure of resection. For follow-up, most sites (60%) issue qualitative reports, while 27% report an assessment according to the RANO criteria. A minority of sites use a reporting template (23%). Conclusion: Clinical best practice recommendations for glioma imaging assessment are proposed and the current role of advanced MRI modalities in routine use is addressed. Key Points: • We recommend the EORTC-NBTS protocol as the clinical standard glioma protocol.• Perfusion MRI is recommended for diagnosis and follow-up of glioma.• Use of advanced imaging could be promoted with increased education activities.• Most response assessment is currently performed qualitatively.• Reporting templates are not widely used, and could facilitate standardisation.

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in press
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keywords
Brain neoplasms, Glioma, Guideline, Magnetic resonance imaging, Surveys and questionnaires
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European Radiology
pages
12 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043698573
ISSN
0938-7994
DOI
10.1007/s00330-018-5314-5
language
English
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yes
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644ab181-8a61-4eac-9ced-f50b9a09cdfa
date added to LUP
2018-03-29 10:28:36
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2018-09-16 04:54:20
@article{644ab181-8a61-4eac-9ced-f50b9a09cdfa,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: At a European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) Annual Meeting 2015 workshop, commonalities in practice, current controversies and technical hurdles in glioma MRI were discussed. We aimed to formulate guidance on MRI of glioma and determine its feasibility, by seeking information on glioma imaging practices from the European Neuroradiology community. Methods: Invitations to a structured survey were emailed to ESNR members (n=1,662) and associates (n=6,400), European national radiologists’ societies and distributed via social media. Results: Responses were received from 220 institutions (59% academic). Conventional imaging protocols generally include T2w, T2-FLAIR, DWI, and pre- and post-contrast T1w. Perfusion MRI is used widely (85.5%), while spectroscopy seems reserved for specific indications. Reasons for omitting advanced imaging modalities include lack of facility/software, time constraints and no requests. Early postoperative MRI is routinely carried out by 74% within 24–72 h, but only 17% report a percent measure of resection. For follow-up, most sites (60%) issue qualitative reports, while 27% report an assessment according to the RANO criteria. A minority of sites use a reporting template (23%). Conclusion: Clinical best practice recommendations for glioma imaging assessment are proposed and the current role of advanced MRI modalities in routine use is addressed. Key Points: • We recommend the EORTC-NBTS protocol as the clinical standard glioma protocol.• Perfusion MRI is recommended for diagnosis and follow-up of glioma.• Use of advanced imaging could be promoted with increased education activities.• Most response assessment is currently performed qualitatively.• Reporting templates are not widely used, and could facilitate standardisation.</p>},
  author       = {Thust, S. C. and Heiland, S. and Falini, A. and Jäger, H. R. and Waldman, A. D. and Sundgren, P. C. and Godi, C. and Katsaros, V. K. and Ramos, A. and Bargallo, N. and Vernooij, M. W. and Yousry, T. and Bendszus, M. and Smits, M.},
  issn         = {0938-7994},
  keyword      = {Brain neoplasms,Glioma,Guideline,Magnetic resonance imaging,Surveys and questionnaires},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {1--12},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Radiology},
  title        = {Glioma imaging in Europe : A survey of 220 centres and recommendations for best clinical practice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-018-5314-5},
  year         = {2018},
}