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Seasonal denitrification potential in wetland sediments with organic matter from different plant species

Bastviken, S. Kallner; Eriksson, Peder LU ; Ekstrom, A. and Tonderski, K. (2007) In Water, Air and Soil Pollution 183(1-4). p.25-35
Abstract
Vegetation both physically and biochemically influences denitrification in wetlands. Litter from various plant species supplies various amounts and qualities of organic carbon to denitrifying bacteria, and may thus affect denitrification capacity. We explore whether there is seasonal variation in the denitrification potential in stands of Glyceria maxima, Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, and Potamogeton pectinatus (the stands differed in terms of which species was predominant). Experiments and measurements investigated whether denitrification potential was related to organic matter and its availability to denitrifying bacteria, suitability for bacterial growth, and amount in the wetland. Availability of organic material, as measured... (More)
Vegetation both physically and biochemically influences denitrification in wetlands. Litter from various plant species supplies various amounts and qualities of organic carbon to denitrifying bacteria, and may thus affect denitrification capacity. We explore whether there is seasonal variation in the denitrification potential in stands of Glyceria maxima, Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, and Potamogeton pectinatus (the stands differed in terms of which species was predominant). Experiments and measurements investigated whether denitrification potential was related to organic matter and its availability to denitrifying bacteria, suitability for bacterial growth, and amount in the wetland. Availability of organic material, as measured in the slurries, was highest in the G. maxima and P. pectinatus samples, with the highest availability in May and August. However, when the samples were closer to wetland conditions, i.e., intact sediment cores containing litter and organic sediment, the denitrifying capacity was highest in the cores from G. maxima stands, but lowest in P. pectinatus cores. In addition, the denitrification potential of the intact cores was highest in November. Differences in denitrification capacity between the slurries and intact sediment cores, considering the organic material of the plant species and the seasonal pattern, were attributed to differences in the amount of plant litter generated. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
intact core, sediment, organic matter, organic material, litter, macrophytes, wetlands, denitrification, potential denitrification
in
Water, Air and Soil Pollution
volume
183
issue
1-4
pages
25 - 35
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000247392100004
  • scopus:34249812976
ISSN
1573-2932
DOI
10.1007/s11270-007-9352-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9bd9640b-7f4b-4e3b-8b77-981c614e6dbf (old id 647903)
date added to LUP
2007-12-07 14:10:16
date last changed
2017-02-19 03:32:00
@article{9bd9640b-7f4b-4e3b-8b77-981c614e6dbf,
  abstract     = {Vegetation both physically and biochemically influences denitrification in wetlands. Litter from various plant species supplies various amounts and qualities of organic carbon to denitrifying bacteria, and may thus affect denitrification capacity. We explore whether there is seasonal variation in the denitrification potential in stands of Glyceria maxima, Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, and Potamogeton pectinatus (the stands differed in terms of which species was predominant). Experiments and measurements investigated whether denitrification potential was related to organic matter and its availability to denitrifying bacteria, suitability for bacterial growth, and amount in the wetland. Availability of organic material, as measured in the slurries, was highest in the G. maxima and P. pectinatus samples, with the highest availability in May and August. However, when the samples were closer to wetland conditions, i.e., intact sediment cores containing litter and organic sediment, the denitrifying capacity was highest in the cores from G. maxima stands, but lowest in P. pectinatus cores. In addition, the denitrification potential of the intact cores was highest in November. Differences in denitrification capacity between the slurries and intact sediment cores, considering the organic material of the plant species and the seasonal pattern, were attributed to differences in the amount of plant litter generated.},
  author       = {Bastviken, S. Kallner and Eriksson, Peder and Ekstrom, A. and Tonderski, K.},
  issn         = {1573-2932},
  keyword      = {intact core,sediment,organic matter,organic material,litter,macrophytes,wetlands,denitrification,potential denitrification},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {25--35},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Water, Air and Soil Pollution},
  title        = {Seasonal denitrification potential in wetland sediments with organic matter from different plant species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11270-007-9352-x},
  volume       = {183},
  year         = {2007},
}