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Medical applications of X-ray fluorescence for trace element research

Borjesson, Jimmy and Mattsson, Sören LU (2007) In Powder Diffraction 22(2). p.130-137
Abstract
Techniques for estimation of element levels directly in humans (noninvasive in vivo) or in samples (in vitro) from humans are reviewed. Toxic, nonessential, trace elements may cause temporary or permanent damage to various organs and tissues in humans. There is thus a need to control the concentrations. Knowledge of the relations between toxic effects and element concentration may be extracted from measurements in humans as well as in samples from humans and her environment. Applications traditionally include occupationally exposed subjects, but an increasing research area is studies of members of the general population and of patients undergoing therapy for malignant and other diseases. Most in vivo XRF studies deal with lead in bone and... (More)
Techniques for estimation of element levels directly in humans (noninvasive in vivo) or in samples (in vitro) from humans are reviewed. Toxic, nonessential, trace elements may cause temporary or permanent damage to various organs and tissues in humans. There is thus a need to control the concentrations. Knowledge of the relations between toxic effects and element concentration may be extracted from measurements in humans as well as in samples from humans and her environment. Applications traditionally include occupationally exposed subjects, but an increasing research area is studies of members of the general population and of patients undergoing therapy for malignant and other diseases. Most in vivo XRF studies deal with lead in bone and cadmium in kidneys. For retired lead workers, a clear association has been demonstrated between bone lead and blood lead, due to endogenous lead excretion from the skeleton. A study of mercury in vivo showed that the technique is capable of detecting mercury in heavily exposed worker's kidneys. In vivo XRF in cancer and rheumatology patients has helped to understand how platinum and gold are retained in the human body. The newest in vivo applications include zinc in prostate gland and arsenic in skin. (c) 2007 International Centre for Diffraction Data. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
mercury, lead, cadmium, X-ray fluorescence, in vivo, iodine
in
Powder Diffraction
volume
22
issue
2
pages
130 - 137
publisher
International Centre for Diffraction Data
external identifiers
  • wos:000247414900009
  • scopus:34249893626
ISSN
0885-7156
DOI
10.1154/1.2737468
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fe06bd55-58a7-446a-9003-71a52e5575fe (old id 647972)
date added to LUP
2007-12-11 15:29:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:47:02
@article{fe06bd55-58a7-446a-9003-71a52e5575fe,
  abstract     = {Techniques for estimation of element levels directly in humans (noninvasive in vivo) or in samples (in vitro) from humans are reviewed. Toxic, nonessential, trace elements may cause temporary or permanent damage to various organs and tissues in humans. There is thus a need to control the concentrations. Knowledge of the relations between toxic effects and element concentration may be extracted from measurements in humans as well as in samples from humans and her environment. Applications traditionally include occupationally exposed subjects, but an increasing research area is studies of members of the general population and of patients undergoing therapy for malignant and other diseases. Most in vivo XRF studies deal with lead in bone and cadmium in kidneys. For retired lead workers, a clear association has been demonstrated between bone lead and blood lead, due to endogenous lead excretion from the skeleton. A study of mercury in vivo showed that the technique is capable of detecting mercury in heavily exposed worker's kidneys. In vivo XRF in cancer and rheumatology patients has helped to understand how platinum and gold are retained in the human body. The newest in vivo applications include zinc in prostate gland and arsenic in skin. (c) 2007 International Centre for Diffraction Data.},
  author       = {Borjesson, Jimmy and Mattsson, Sören},
  issn         = {0885-7156},
  keyword      = {mercury,lead,cadmium,X-ray fluorescence,in vivo,iodine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {130--137},
  publisher    = {International Centre for Diffraction Data},
  series       = {Powder Diffraction},
  title        = {Medical applications of X-ray fluorescence for trace element research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1154/1.2737468},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2007},
}