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Effect of cinnamon on postprandial blood glucose, gastric emptying, and satiety in healthy subjects

Hlebowicz, Joanna LU ; Darwiche, Gassan; Björgell, Ola LU and Almér, Lars-Olof LU (2007) In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 85(6). p.1552-1556
Abstract
Background: Previous studies of patients with type 2 diabetes showed that cinnamon lowers fasting serum glucose, triacylglycerol, and LDL- and total cholesterol concentrations. Objective: We aimed to study the effect of cinnamon on the rate of gastric emptying, the postprandial blood glucose response, and satiety in healthy subjects. Design: The gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured by using standardized real-time ultrasonography. Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed by using a crossover trial. The subjects were examined after an 8-h fast if they had normal fasting blood glucose concentrations. GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15-90 min after ingestion of 300 g rice pudding (GER1) or 300... (More)
Background: Previous studies of patients with type 2 diabetes showed that cinnamon lowers fasting serum glucose, triacylglycerol, and LDL- and total cholesterol concentrations. Objective: We aimed to study the effect of cinnamon on the rate of gastric emptying, the postprandial blood glucose response, and satiety in healthy subjects. Design: The gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured by using standardized real-time ultrasonography. Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed by using a crossover trial. The subjects were examined after an 8-h fast if they had normal fasting blood glucose concentrations. GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15-90 min after ingestion of 300 g rice pudding (GER1) or 300 g rice pudding and 6 g cinnamon (GER2). Results: The median value of GER 1 was 37%, and that of GER2 was 34.5%. The addition of cinnamon to the rice pudding significantly delayed gastric emptying and lowered the postprandial glucose response (P < 0.05 for both). The reduction in the postprandial blood glucose concentration was much more noticeable and pronounced than was the lowering of the GER. The effect of cinnamon on satiety was not significant. Conclusions: The intake of 6 g cinnamon with rice pudding reduces postprandial blood glucose and delays gastric emptying without affecting satiety. Inclusion of cinnamon in the diet lowers the postprandial glucose response, a change that is at least partially explained by a delayed GER. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cinnamon, blood glucose, healthy subjects, gastric emptying, diabetes, satiety
in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
85
issue
6
pages
1552 - 1556
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • wos:000247196300017
  • scopus:34250001148
ISSN
1938-3207
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0877e128-5e38-4f53-9c9a-6fcebe334233 (old id 649022)
alternative location
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/6/1552
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17556692&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-12-12 14:12:09
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:27:13
@article{0877e128-5e38-4f53-9c9a-6fcebe334233,
  abstract     = {Background: Previous studies of patients with type 2 diabetes showed that cinnamon lowers fasting serum glucose, triacylglycerol, and LDL- and total cholesterol concentrations. Objective: We aimed to study the effect of cinnamon on the rate of gastric emptying, the postprandial blood glucose response, and satiety in healthy subjects. Design: The gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured by using standardized real-time ultrasonography. Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed by using a crossover trial. The subjects were examined after an 8-h fast if they had normal fasting blood glucose concentrations. GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15-90 min after ingestion of 300 g rice pudding (GER1) or 300 g rice pudding and 6 g cinnamon (GER2). Results: The median value of GER 1 was 37%, and that of GER2 was 34.5%. The addition of cinnamon to the rice pudding significantly delayed gastric emptying and lowered the postprandial glucose response (P &lt; 0.05 for both). The reduction in the postprandial blood glucose concentration was much more noticeable and pronounced than was the lowering of the GER. The effect of cinnamon on satiety was not significant. Conclusions: The intake of 6 g cinnamon with rice pudding reduces postprandial blood glucose and delays gastric emptying without affecting satiety. Inclusion of cinnamon in the diet lowers the postprandial glucose response, a change that is at least partially explained by a delayed GER.},
  author       = {Hlebowicz, Joanna and Darwiche, Gassan and Björgell, Ola and Almér, Lars-Olof},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  keyword      = {cinnamon,blood glucose,healthy subjects,gastric emptying,diabetes,satiety},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1552--1556},
  publisher    = {American Society for Clinical Nutrition},
  series       = {American Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Effect of cinnamon on postprandial blood glucose, gastric emptying, and satiety in healthy subjects},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2007},
}