Advanced

Monitoring respiration using the pressure sensors in a dialysis machine

Sandberg, Frida LU ; Holmer, Mattias LU and Olde, Bo (2019) In Physiological Measurement 40(2).
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although respiratory problems are common among patients with end-stage renal disease, respiration is not continuously monitored during dialysis. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of monitoring respiration using the pressure sensors of the dialysis machine. APPROACH: Respiration induces variations in the blood pressure that propagates to the extracorporeal circuit of the dialysis machine. However, the magnitude of these variations are very small compared to pressure variations induced by the dialysis machine. We propose a new method, which involves adaptive template subtraction and peak conditioned spectral averaging, to estimate respiration rate from the pressure sensor signals. Using this... (More)

OBJECTIVE: Although respiratory problems are common among patients with end-stage renal disease, respiration is not continuously monitored during dialysis. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of monitoring respiration using the pressure sensors of the dialysis machine. APPROACH: Respiration induces variations in the blood pressure that propagates to the extracorporeal circuit of the dialysis machine. However, the magnitude of these variations are very small compared to pressure variations induced by the dialysis machine. We propose a new method, which involves adaptive template subtraction and peak conditioned spectral averaging, to estimate respiration rate from the pressure sensor signals. Using this method, an estimate of the respiration rate is obtained every 5th second provided that the signal quality is sufficient. The method is evaluated for continuous monitoring of respiration rate in nine dialysis treatment sessions. MAIN RESULTS: The median absolute deviation between the estimated respiration rate from the pressure sensor signals and a reference capnography recording was 0.02 Hz (1.3 breaths per min). SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that continuous monitoring of respiration using the pressure sensors of the dialysis machine is feasible. The main advantage with such monitoring is that no additional sensors are required which may cause patient discomfort.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physiological Measurement
volume
40
issue
2
article number
025001
publisher
IOP Publishing
external identifiers
  • pmid:30562167
  • scopus:85061248783
ISSN
0967-3334
DOI
10.1088/1361-6579/aaf978
project
Andningsbaserad prediktering av intradialytisk hypotension
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
64bd8651-880c-40e1-85c9-4f815a1e967d
date added to LUP
2019-02-19 07:34:23
date last changed
2020-02-12 09:54:21
@article{64bd8651-880c-40e1-85c9-4f815a1e967d,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: Although respiratory problems are common among patients with end-stage renal disease, respiration is not continuously monitored during dialysis. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of monitoring respiration using the pressure sensors of the dialysis machine. APPROACH: Respiration induces variations in the blood pressure that propagates to the extracorporeal circuit of the dialysis machine. However, the magnitude of these variations are very small compared to pressure variations induced by the dialysis machine. We propose a new method, which involves adaptive template subtraction and peak conditioned spectral averaging, to estimate respiration rate from the pressure sensor signals. Using this method, an estimate of the respiration rate is obtained every 5th second provided that the signal quality is sufficient. The method is evaluated for continuous monitoring of respiration rate in nine dialysis treatment sessions. MAIN RESULTS: The median absolute deviation between the estimated respiration rate from the pressure sensor signals and a reference capnography recording was 0.02 Hz (1.3 breaths per min). SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that continuous monitoring of respiration using the pressure sensors of the dialysis machine is feasible. The main advantage with such monitoring is that no additional sensors are required which may cause patient discomfort.</p>},
  author       = {Sandberg, Frida and Holmer, Mattias and Olde, Bo},
  issn         = {0967-3334},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {IOP Publishing},
  series       = {Physiological Measurement},
  title        = {Monitoring respiration using the pressure sensors in a dialysis machine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1361-6579/aaf978},
  doi          = {10.1088/1361-6579/aaf978},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2019},
}