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Malignancies In Giant Cell Arteritis : A Population-Based Cohort Study

Stamatis, Pavlos LU ; Turesson, Carl LU ; Willim, Minna LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU ; Englund, Martin LU and Mohammad, Aladdin J LU (2019) In Journal of Rheumatology 46(7).
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of cancer in patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) from a defined population in southern Sweden.

METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 830 patients (mean age at GCA diagnosis was 76.3 years, 74 % women) diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA between 1997 and 2010. Temporal artery biopsy results were retrieved from a regional database and reviewed to ascertain GCA diagnosis. The cohort was linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. The patients were followed from GCA diagnosis until death or December 31, 2013. Incident malignancies registered after GCA diagnosis were studied. Based on data on the first malignancy in each organ system, age- and sex standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with... (More)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of cancer in patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) from a defined population in southern Sweden.

METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 830 patients (mean age at GCA diagnosis was 76.3 years, 74 % women) diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA between 1997 and 2010. Temporal artery biopsy results were retrieved from a regional database and reviewed to ascertain GCA diagnosis. The cohort was linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. The patients were followed from GCA diagnosis until death or December 31, 2013. Incident malignancies registered after GCA diagnosis were studied. Based on data on the first malignancy in each organ system, age- and sex standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated compared to the background population.

RESULTS: 107 patients (13%) were diagnosed with a total of 118 new malignancies after the onset of GCA. The overall risk for cancer after the GCA diagnosis was not increased (SIR 0.98; 95% CI 0.81 - 1.17). However, there was an increased risk for myeloid leukemia (2.31; 95% CI 1.06 - 4.39) and a reduced risk for breast cancer (0.33; 95% CI 0.12 - 0.72) and upper gastrointestinal tract cancer (0.16; 95% 0.004- 0.91). Rates of other site-specific cancers were not different from expected.

CONCLUSION: In this Swedish population-based cohort of GCA, the overall risk for cancer was not increased compared to the background population. However, there was an increased risk for leukemia and a decreased risk for breast and upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Rheumatology
volume
46
issue
7
publisher
J Rheumatol Publ Co
ISSN
0315-162X
DOI
10.3899/jrheum.190236
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
64cdd2ea-426f-49fb-ba68-5ebc0ac58d99
date added to LUP
2019-06-20 11:22:50
date last changed
2019-07-11 02:18:30
@article{64cdd2ea-426f-49fb-ba68-5ebc0ac58d99,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of cancer in patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) from a defined population in southern Sweden.</p><p>METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 830 patients (mean age at GCA diagnosis was 76.3 years, 74 % women) diagnosed with biopsy-proven GCA between 1997 and 2010. Temporal artery biopsy results were retrieved from a regional database and reviewed to ascertain GCA diagnosis. The cohort was linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. The patients were followed from GCA diagnosis until death or December 31, 2013. Incident malignancies registered after GCA diagnosis were studied. Based on data on the first malignancy in each organ system, age- and sex standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated compared to the background population.</p><p>RESULTS: 107 patients (13%) were diagnosed with a total of 118 new malignancies after the onset of GCA. The overall risk for cancer after the GCA diagnosis was not increased (SIR 0.98; 95% CI 0.81 - 1.17). However, there was an increased risk for myeloid leukemia (2.31; 95% CI 1.06 - 4.39) and a reduced risk for breast cancer (0.33; 95% CI 0.12 - 0.72) and upper gastrointestinal tract cancer (0.16; 95% 0.004- 0.91). Rates of other site-specific cancers were not different from expected.</p><p>CONCLUSION: In this Swedish population-based cohort of GCA, the overall risk for cancer was not increased compared to the background population. However, there was an increased risk for leukemia and a decreased risk for breast and upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.</p>},
  author       = {Stamatis, Pavlos and Turesson, Carl and Willim, Minna and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Englund, Martin and Mohammad, Aladdin J},
  issn         = {0315-162X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {7},
  publisher    = {J Rheumatol Publ Co},
  series       = {Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Malignancies In Giant Cell Arteritis : A Population-Based Cohort Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.190236},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2019},
}