Advanced

Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of plasma and urine alpha(1)-microglobulin in healthy donors and patients with different haemolytic disorders and haemochromatosis

Nordberg, Jonas LU ; Allhorn, Maria LU ; Winqvist, Ingemar; Åkerström, Bo LU and Olsson, Martin LU (2007) In Clinica Chimica Acta 386(1-2). p.31-37
Abstract
Background: The haem-binding protein alpha(1)-microglobulin (alpha(1)m) is involved in protection against oxidative damage induced by extracellular haem/haemoglobin. A carboxy-terminally truncated form of alpha(1)m (t-alpha(1)m), formed by reactions with haemoglobin, degrades haem into a yellow-brown chromophore linked to the protein. The aim of this work was to investigate if t-alpha(1) in is present in urine from a large cohort and if urinary and plasma alpha(1)m/t-alpha(1)m concentrations are changed in patients with haemolytic disorders and haemochromatosis. Methods: Urine and blood from patients (n = 20) and a control group (n = 22) were investigated for alpha(1) in and t-alpha(1)m by gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and... (More)
Background: The haem-binding protein alpha(1)-microglobulin (alpha(1)m) is involved in protection against oxidative damage induced by extracellular haem/haemoglobin. A carboxy-terminally truncated form of alpha(1)m (t-alpha(1)m), formed by reactions with haemoglobin, degrades haem into a yellow-brown chromophore linked to the protein. The aim of this work was to investigate if t-alpha(1) in is present in urine from a large cohort and if urinary and plasma alpha(1)m/t-alpha(1)m concentrations are changed in patients with haemolytic disorders and haemochromatosis. Methods: Urine and blood from patients (n = 20) and a control group (n = 22) were investigated for alpha(1) in and t-alpha(1)m by gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and radioimmunoassay. Data were compared to clinical chemistry data and medical records. Results: Two thirds of all studied subjects displayed t-alpha(1)m in urine but the t-alpha(1)m/alpha(1)m ratio was not increased in patients. Instead, significantly elevated ratios were found in females compared to males. Patients with intravascular or extravascular haemolysis showed higher alpha(1)m, albumin and beta(2)-microglobulin/creatinine ratios in urine indicating glomerulo-tubular dysfunction. Conclusions: The demonstration of t-alpha(1)m in urine of this cohort may be of importance in quantitative clinical chemistry. Whilst impaired kidney function due to intravascular haemolysis is well-known to occur, it is an unexpected finding in a group of patients with extravascular haemolysis. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
alpha-l-microglobulin, lipocalins, protein HC, kidney, haemolysis
in
Clinica Chimica Acta
volume
386
issue
1-2
pages
31 - 37
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000250195700006
  • scopus:34548680086
ISSN
0009-8981
DOI
10.1016/j.cca.2007.07.017
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a75c1c5b-e9f2-48a0-9a25-d658efced49d (old id 655400)
date added to LUP
2007-12-14 09:54:12
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:21:22
@article{a75c1c5b-e9f2-48a0-9a25-d658efced49d,
  abstract     = {Background: The haem-binding protein alpha(1)-microglobulin (alpha(1)m) is involved in protection against oxidative damage induced by extracellular haem/haemoglobin. A carboxy-terminally truncated form of alpha(1)m (t-alpha(1)m), formed by reactions with haemoglobin, degrades haem into a yellow-brown chromophore linked to the protein. The aim of this work was to investigate if t-alpha(1) in is present in urine from a large cohort and if urinary and plasma alpha(1)m/t-alpha(1)m concentrations are changed in patients with haemolytic disorders and haemochromatosis. Methods: Urine and blood from patients (n = 20) and a control group (n = 22) were investigated for alpha(1) in and t-alpha(1)m by gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and radioimmunoassay. Data were compared to clinical chemistry data and medical records. Results: Two thirds of all studied subjects displayed t-alpha(1)m in urine but the t-alpha(1)m/alpha(1)m ratio was not increased in patients. Instead, significantly elevated ratios were found in females compared to males. Patients with intravascular or extravascular haemolysis showed higher alpha(1)m, albumin and beta(2)-microglobulin/creatinine ratios in urine indicating glomerulo-tubular dysfunction. Conclusions: The demonstration of t-alpha(1)m in urine of this cohort may be of importance in quantitative clinical chemistry. Whilst impaired kidney function due to intravascular haemolysis is well-known to occur, it is an unexpected finding in a group of patients with extravascular haemolysis. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Nordberg, Jonas and Allhorn, Maria and Winqvist, Ingemar and Åkerström, Bo and Olsson, Martin},
  issn         = {0009-8981},
  keyword      = {alpha-l-microglobulin,lipocalins,protein HC,kidney,haemolysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {31--37},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinica Chimica Acta},
  title        = {Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of plasma and urine alpha(1)-microglobulin in healthy donors and patients with different haemolytic disorders and haemochromatosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2007.07.017},
  volume       = {386},
  year         = {2007},
}