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Understanding the effects of a decentralized budget on physicians' compliance with guidelines for statin prescription - a multilevel methodological approach

Ohlsson, Henrik and Merlo, Juan LU (2007) In BMC Health Services Research 7.
Abstract
Background: Official guidelines that promote evidence-based and cost-effective prescribing are of main relevance for obvious reasons. However, to what extent these guidelines are followed and their conditioning factors at different levels of the health care system are still insufficiently known. In January 2004, a decentralized drug budget was implemented in the county of Scania, Sweden. Focusing on lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins), we evaluated the effect of this intervention across a 25-month period. We expected that increased local economic responsibility would promote prescribing of recommended statins. Methods: We performed two separate multilevel regression analyses; on 110 827 individual prescriptions issued at 136... (More)
Background: Official guidelines that promote evidence-based and cost-effective prescribing are of main relevance for obvious reasons. However, to what extent these guidelines are followed and their conditioning factors at different levels of the health care system are still insufficiently known. In January 2004, a decentralized drug budget was implemented in the county of Scania, Sweden. Focusing on lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins), we evaluated the effect of this intervention across a 25-month period. We expected that increased local economic responsibility would promote prescribing of recommended statins. Methods: We performed two separate multilevel regression analyses; on 110 827 individual prescriptions issued at 136 publicly-administered health care centres (HCCs) nested within 14 administrative areas (HCAs), and on 72 012 individual prescriptions issued by 115 privately-administered HCCs. Temporal trends in the prevalence of prescription of recommended statins were investigated by random slope analysis. Differences (i.e., variance) between HCCs and between HCAs were expressed by median odds ratio (MOR). Results: After the implementation of the decentralized drug budget, adherence to guidelines increased continuously. At the end of the observation period, however, practice variation remained high. Prescription of recommended statins presented a high degree of clustering within both publicly (i.e., MORHCC = 2.18 and MORHCA = 1.31 respectively) and privately administered facilities (MORHCC = 3.47). Conclusion: A decentralized drug budget seems to promote adherence to guidelines for statin prescription. However, the high practice differences at the end of the observation period may reflect inefficient therapeutic traditions, and indicates that rational statin prescription could be further improved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Health Services Research
volume
7
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000247013800001
  • scopus:34249800114
ISSN
1472-6963
DOI
10.1186/1472-6963-7-68
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
68865273-956e-45a1-b5c3-241271955382 (old id 660579)
date added to LUP
2007-12-19 10:07:04
date last changed
2017-02-19 04:15:18
@article{68865273-956e-45a1-b5c3-241271955382,
  abstract     = {Background: Official guidelines that promote evidence-based and cost-effective prescribing are of main relevance for obvious reasons. However, to what extent these guidelines are followed and their conditioning factors at different levels of the health care system are still insufficiently known. In January 2004, a decentralized drug budget was implemented in the county of Scania, Sweden. Focusing on lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins), we evaluated the effect of this intervention across a 25-month period. We expected that increased local economic responsibility would promote prescribing of recommended statins. Methods: We performed two separate multilevel regression analyses; on 110 827 individual prescriptions issued at 136 publicly-administered health care centres (HCCs) nested within 14 administrative areas (HCAs), and on 72 012 individual prescriptions issued by 115 privately-administered HCCs. Temporal trends in the prevalence of prescription of recommended statins were investigated by random slope analysis. Differences (i.e., variance) between HCCs and between HCAs were expressed by median odds ratio (MOR). Results: After the implementation of the decentralized drug budget, adherence to guidelines increased continuously. At the end of the observation period, however, practice variation remained high. Prescription of recommended statins presented a high degree of clustering within both publicly (i.e., MORHCC = 2.18 and MORHCA = 1.31 respectively) and privately administered facilities (MORHCC = 3.47). Conclusion: A decentralized drug budget seems to promote adherence to guidelines for statin prescription. However, the high practice differences at the end of the observation period may reflect inefficient therapeutic traditions, and indicates that rational statin prescription could be further improved.},
  author       = {Ohlsson, Henrik and Merlo, Juan},
  issn         = {1472-6963},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Health Services Research},
  title        = {Understanding the effects of a decentralized budget on physicians' compliance with guidelines for statin prescription - a multilevel methodological approach},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-7-68},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2007},
}