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Health-related quality of life in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

Beiske, A. G.; Naess, H.; Aarseth, J. H.; Andersen, O.; Elovaara, I.; Farkkila, M.; Hansen, H. J.; Mellgren, S. I.; Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild LU and Sorensen, P. S., et al. (2007) In Multiple Sclerosis 13(3). p.386-392
Abstract
Common disability scales in multiple sclerosis (MS) are often weighted towards physical disability. Non-motor symptoms such as depression, fatigue and pain substantially influence wellbeing in MS. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures the broader impact of MS and might indicate less obvious disease burdens. We analysed HRQoL, using the Nottingham Health Profile Part I (NHP-I), among 345 secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients participating in a randomized trial of interferon-beta 1a (IFN-beta 1a), 22 mu g subcutaneously weekly, or matching placebo. The results did not reveal any beneficial effect of IFN-beta 1a in any outcome measure. NHP-I sub- and sum scores were compared for 217 population controls and correlated with... (More)
Common disability scales in multiple sclerosis (MS) are often weighted towards physical disability. Non-motor symptoms such as depression, fatigue and pain substantially influence wellbeing in MS. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures the broader impact of MS and might indicate less obvious disease burdens. We analysed HRQoL, using the Nottingham Health Profile Part I (NHP-I), among 345 secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients participating in a randomized trial of interferon-beta 1a (IFN-beta 1a), 22 mu g subcutaneously weekly, or matching placebo. The results did not reveal any beneficial effect of IFN-beta 1a in any outcome measure. NHP-I sub- and sum scores were compared for 217 population controls and correlated with demographic and clinical disease variables. SPMS patients had lower NHP-I sum and all subscores than the controls. Patients experiencing disease progression reported worse NHP-I sum scores. Increased fatigue, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Arm Index scores were independently associated with reduction in several NHP-I subscores. SPMS patients had significantly lower HRQoL than controls and physical disability (EDSS and Arm Index), disease progression and fatigue strongly influenced this. MS influenced subdimensions such as pain, sleep and emotional reactions. Increased focus on optimizing symptomatic treatment and psychosocial patient care could improve patients' HRQoL. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fatigue, multiple sclerosis, quality of life
in
Multiple Sclerosis
volume
13
issue
3
pages
386 - 392
publisher
Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC
external identifiers
  • wos:000246016300009
  • scopus:34248192284
ISSN
1477-0970
DOI
10.1177/13524585070130030101
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a2967495-8614-452f-a813-4cb83b2d0bbb (old id 663330)
date added to LUP
2007-12-05 11:01:34
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:57:03
@article{a2967495-8614-452f-a813-4cb83b2d0bbb,
  abstract     = {Common disability scales in multiple sclerosis (MS) are often weighted towards physical disability. Non-motor symptoms such as depression, fatigue and pain substantially influence wellbeing in MS. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures the broader impact of MS and might indicate less obvious disease burdens. We analysed HRQoL, using the Nottingham Health Profile Part I (NHP-I), among 345 secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients participating in a randomized trial of interferon-beta 1a (IFN-beta 1a), 22 mu g subcutaneously weekly, or matching placebo. The results did not reveal any beneficial effect of IFN-beta 1a in any outcome measure. NHP-I sub- and sum scores were compared for 217 population controls and correlated with demographic and clinical disease variables. SPMS patients had lower NHP-I sum and all subscores than the controls. Patients experiencing disease progression reported worse NHP-I sum scores. Increased fatigue, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Arm Index scores were independently associated with reduction in several NHP-I subscores. SPMS patients had significantly lower HRQoL than controls and physical disability (EDSS and Arm Index), disease progression and fatigue strongly influenced this. MS influenced subdimensions such as pain, sleep and emotional reactions. Increased focus on optimizing symptomatic treatment and psychosocial patient care could improve patients' HRQoL.},
  author       = {Beiske, A. G. and Naess, H. and Aarseth, J. H. and Andersen, O. and Elovaara, I. and Farkkila, M. and Hansen, H. J. and Mellgren, S. I. and Sandberg Wollheim, Magnhild and Sorensen, P. S. and Myhr, K. M.},
  issn         = {1477-0970},
  keyword      = {fatigue,multiple sclerosis,quality of life},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {386--392},
  publisher    = {Arnold, Hodder Headline PLC},
  series       = {Multiple Sclerosis},
  title        = {Health-related quality of life in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13524585070130030101},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2007},
}