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Perceived discrimination, socioeconomic disadvantage and refraining from seeking medical treatment in Sweden

Wamala, Sarah; Merlo, Juan LU ; Boström, Gunnel and Hogstedt, Christer (2007) In Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 61(5). p.409-415
Abstract
Study objective: To analyse the association between perceived discrimination and refraining from seeking required medical treatment and the contribution of socioeconomic disadvantage. Design and setting: Data from the Swedish National Survey of Public Health 2004 were used for analysis. Respondents were asked whether they had refrained from seeking required medical treatment during the past 3 months. Perceived discrimination was based on whether respondents reported that they had been treated in a way that made them feel humiliated ( due to ethnicity/race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability). The Socioeconomic Disadvantage Index ( SDI) was developed to measure economic deprivation ( social welfare beneficiary, being... (More)
Study objective: To analyse the association between perceived discrimination and refraining from seeking required medical treatment and the contribution of socioeconomic disadvantage. Design and setting: Data from the Swedish National Survey of Public Health 2004 were used for analysis. Respondents were asked whether they had refrained from seeking required medical treatment during the past 3 months. Perceived discrimination was based on whether respondents reported that they had been treated in a way that made them feel humiliated ( due to ethnicity/race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability). The Socioeconomic Disadvantage Index ( SDI) was developed to measure economic deprivation ( social welfare beneficiary, being unemployed, financial crisis and lack of cash reserves). Participants: Swedish population-based survey of 14 736 men and 17 115 women. Main results: Both perceived discrimination and socioeconomic disadvantage were independently associated with refraining from seeking medical treatment. Experiences of frequent discrimination even without any socioeconomic disadvantage were associated with three to nine-fold increased odds for refraining from seeking medical treatment. A combination of both frequent discrimination and severe SDI was associated with a multiplicative effect on refraining from seeking medical treatment, but this effect was statistically more conclusive among women ( OR = 11.6, 95% CI 8.1 to 16.6; Synergy Index ( SI) = 2.0 ( 95% CI 1.2 to 3.2)) than among men ( OR = 12, 95% CI 7.7 to 18.7; SI = 1.6 ( 95% CI 1.3 to 2.1)). Conclusions: The goal of equitable access to healthcare services cannot be achieved without public health strategies that confront and tackle discrimination in society and specifically in the healthcare setting. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
volume
61
issue
5
pages
409 - 415
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000245685800010
  • scopus:34247537102
ISSN
1470-2738
DOI
10.1136/jech.2006.049999
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a4ae3f8a-33ed-426f-9672-4b0f230be5d8 (old id 665951)
date added to LUP
2007-12-19 10:13:39
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:35:53
@article{a4ae3f8a-33ed-426f-9672-4b0f230be5d8,
  abstract     = {Study objective: To analyse the association between perceived discrimination and refraining from seeking required medical treatment and the contribution of socioeconomic disadvantage. Design and setting: Data from the Swedish National Survey of Public Health 2004 were used for analysis. Respondents were asked whether they had refrained from seeking required medical treatment during the past 3 months. Perceived discrimination was based on whether respondents reported that they had been treated in a way that made them feel humiliated ( due to ethnicity/race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability). The Socioeconomic Disadvantage Index ( SDI) was developed to measure economic deprivation ( social welfare beneficiary, being unemployed, financial crisis and lack of cash reserves). Participants: Swedish population-based survey of 14 736 men and 17 115 women. Main results: Both perceived discrimination and socioeconomic disadvantage were independently associated with refraining from seeking medical treatment. Experiences of frequent discrimination even without any socioeconomic disadvantage were associated with three to nine-fold increased odds for refraining from seeking medical treatment. A combination of both frequent discrimination and severe SDI was associated with a multiplicative effect on refraining from seeking medical treatment, but this effect was statistically more conclusive among women ( OR = 11.6, 95% CI 8.1 to 16.6; Synergy Index ( SI) = 2.0 ( 95% CI 1.2 to 3.2)) than among men ( OR = 12, 95% CI 7.7 to 18.7; SI = 1.6 ( 95% CI 1.3 to 2.1)). Conclusions: The goal of equitable access to healthcare services cannot be achieved without public health strategies that confront and tackle discrimination in society and specifically in the healthcare setting.},
  author       = {Wamala, Sarah and Merlo, Juan and Boström, Gunnel and Hogstedt, Christer},
  issn         = {1470-2738},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {409--415},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
  title        = {Perceived discrimination, socioeconomic disadvantage and refraining from seeking medical treatment in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2006.049999},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2007},
}