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Association between vitamin D, antimicrobial peptides and urinary tract infection in infants and young children

Georgieva, V.; Kamolvit, W.; Herthelius, M.; Lüthje, P.; Brauner, A. and Chromek, M. LU (2018) In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Abstract

Aim: Vitamin D stimulates production of the endogenous antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and β-defensin-2, which are expressed in the urinary tract. We investigated vitamin D status and levels of cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 and their association with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: The study included 120 children under three years of age: 76 children with UTIs and 44 otherwise healthy children with congenital hydronephrosis. Serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels were measured by direct competitive electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay, and plasma cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 concentrations were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: We found that vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are prevalent in... (More)

Aim: Vitamin D stimulates production of the endogenous antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and β-defensin-2, which are expressed in the urinary tract. We investigated vitamin D status and levels of cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 and their association with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: The study included 120 children under three years of age: 76 children with UTIs and 44 otherwise healthy children with congenital hydronephrosis. Serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels were measured by direct competitive electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay, and plasma cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 concentrations were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: We found that vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are prevalent in young children (21%). Serum vitamin D levels negatively correlated with age and were significantly lower in girls. Levels of vitamin D positively correlated with levels of cathelicidin but not with β-defensin-2. Low concentrations of vitamin D were associated with UTIs in girls, but we did not see any correlation with the recurrence of infection at one-year follow-up. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is common and may prove to be a risk factor for UTIs especially in girls. We hypothesise that adequate supplementation with vitamin D may become a way to prevent first-time UTIs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Antimicrobial peptides, Cathelicidin, Defensin, Urinary tract infection, Vitamin D
in
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052365715
ISSN
0803-5253
DOI
10.1111/apa.14499
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
66a68565-fb87-4aec-bc4c-0ae0b4e63615
date added to LUP
2018-10-05 07:47:27
date last changed
2019-04-10 04:14:08
@article{66a68565-fb87-4aec-bc4c-0ae0b4e63615,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim: Vitamin D stimulates production of the endogenous antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and β-defensin-2, which are expressed in the urinary tract. We investigated vitamin D status and levels of cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 and their association with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: The study included 120 children under three years of age: 76 children with UTIs and 44 otherwise healthy children with congenital hydronephrosis. Serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels were measured by direct competitive electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay, and plasma cathelicidin and β-defensin-2 concentrations were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: We found that vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are prevalent in young children (21%). Serum vitamin D levels negatively correlated with age and were significantly lower in girls. Levels of vitamin D positively correlated with levels of cathelicidin but not with β-defensin-2. Low concentrations of vitamin D were associated with UTIs in girls, but we did not see any correlation with the recurrence of infection at one-year follow-up. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is common and may prove to be a risk factor for UTIs especially in girls. We hypothesise that adequate supplementation with vitamin D may become a way to prevent first-time UTIs.</p>},
  author       = {Georgieva, V. and Kamolvit, W. and Herthelius, M. and Lüthje, P. and Brauner, A. and Chromek, M.},
  issn         = {0803-5253},
  keyword      = {Antimicrobial peptides,Cathelicidin,Defensin,Urinary tract infection,Vitamin D},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics},
  title        = {Association between vitamin D, antimicrobial peptides and urinary tract infection in infants and young children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.14499},
  year         = {2018},
}